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10:11 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Offseason Arrests Raise Questions For NFL

There have been 47 total arrests since the NFL regular season ended on Dec. 29. But is anything being done by the league to address this problem?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 7:30 am

The offseason is a time of relaxation for NFL players. A time spent away from the field and with family and friends. Unfortunately, this is also a time where players seem to get into more trouble with the law. The arrests of notable players such as Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriot charged with murder, have sparked a flurry of reports regarding a "problem" in the NFL.

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The Salt
9:38 am
Mon July 22, 2013

How An Ethiopian Bean Became The Cinderella Of Coffee

Haleuya Habagaro says she always knew her coffee was exquisite. "When I roast the coffee, people come to ask where that strong fruity smell is coming from."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 8:17 am

As we reported during Coffee Week in April, coffee aficionados pay top dollar for single-origin roasts.

The professional prospectors working for specialty coffee companies will travel far and wide, Marco Polo-style, to discover that next champion bean.

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Middle East
9:17 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Morsi's Ouster In Egypt: A 'Bookend' For The Arab Spring

In Cairo on July 17, supporters of the ousted president demonstrate for his reinstatement.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

After covering the Egyptian revolution that overthrew President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, David Kirkpatrick has now been reporting on the military's ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Kirkpatrick, The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief, arrived in Egypt in January 2011, and days later flew to Tunisia to cover the revolution that launched the Arab Spring.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Missing Lynx? Cat Is On 'Brink Of Extinction,' Study Says

Two Iberian lynxes at a nature reserve in northern Spain. (February 2006 file photo.)
Victor Fraile Reuters /Landov

Already known as "the world's most endangered feline species," the Iberian lynx is headed to extinction in the wild within the next five decades, an international team of researchers warn in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Author Interviews
8:58 am
Mon July 22, 2013

The Gronkowskis On Raising A Family Of Champions

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You know how in America we say we don't like dynasties, but then again, we actually kind of do. And we're certainly fascinated by them, and if you follow sports, in particular football, then you're probably fascinated by the Gronkowskis.

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Remembrances
8:58 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Remembering Helen Thomas: White House Trailblazer

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
8:58 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Some Lawmakers Want To Put Politics Aside

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later this hour, we will take a moment to remember a pioneering journalist and mentor, the irreplaceable Helen Thomas, who died over the weekend at the age of 92. Helen had a lifelong passion for politics and policy and for asking the political leaders the tough questions. But these days, many people have tough questions for our leaders in Washington, or one in particular, and that is, why can't the two political parties in Washington work together? Why can't they get anything done?

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Shots - Health News
8:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Note To Teen Boy With Blowgun: It's Exhale, Not Inhale

The X-ray reveals a blowdart lodged in a teenager's windpipe.
Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics @AAP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:57 am

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Shots - Health News
7:16 am
Mon July 22, 2013

TVs Pose A Danger To Kids, But Not The Way You Might Think

That flat screen can still be dangerous if it falls off the wall.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:57 am

Television poses a threat to children, and we're not talking the programs. We're talking a large household appliance that can hurt kids.

About every 30 minutes a child ends up in the emergency room with injuries caused by a television, a study finds, most often because the TV falls on a young child.

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The Two-Way
6:07 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Will 'Harry Potter' And Newest Royal Share A Birthday?

Actor Daniel Radcliffe.
Heather Wines CBS/Landov

Since there's no news just yet from the London hospital where the Duchess of Cambridge is said to be in labor, we've gone looking for other famous folks who were born on July 22.

According to Biography.com, they include:

-- Actor Albert Brooks (born in 1947).

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The Two-Way
5:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

42 Bodies Recovered After Quebec Disaster; 5 People Missing

In Gatineau, Quebec, earlier this month, candles were burning in memory of the train disaster's victims.
Chris Wattie Reuters /Landov

Two weeks after the horrific train derailment and explosions that devastated the Quebec town of Lac-Mégantic, "authorities have found 42 bodies at the site and are still looking for five more who are feared dead," The Canadian Press reports.

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Shots - Health News
5:15 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Laws Limiting Abortion May Face Challenges On 20-Week Limit

Becca Besaw of Austin, Texas, and Christopher Robertson of Fort Worth, Texas, protest the state's new law restricting access to abortion at a rally in Dallas on July 15.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:57 am

Banning abortions after a specific point in pregnancy has been a popular trend in the states this year. Last week, GOP Gov. Rick Perry made Texas the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks.

But how states define the starting point for that 20 weeks may cause headaches for women and their doctors — and ultimately affect whether these laws pass constitutional muster.

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Parallels
4:54 am
Mon July 22, 2013

As Cambodian Factories Expand, Conditions Are Criticized

Cambodian rescuers at the site of a factory collapse near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on May 16. Two workers were killed in the collapse. The garment industry has expanded rapidly in Cambodia, but last week, a new report pointed to a deterioration in working conditions in the country.
Heng Sinith AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:14 am

We've been looking at working conditions in Bangladesh where the collapse in April of a building that housed garment factories killed more than 1,000 people.

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The Two-Way
3:53 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Top Stories: Royal Baby Wait; Mandela Improving

Former South African President Nelson Mandela has been in a Pretoria hospital since June 8. He's being treated for a life-threatening respiratory infection. Last week he turned 95 and a banner near the hospital drew admirers such as this woman.
Siphiwe Sibeko Reuters /Landov
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Monkey See
3:20 am
Mon July 22, 2013

20 Really Great Royal Baby Titles For Classy Parents

Marat Sirotyukov iStockphoto.com

Look, it's possible that I don't completely understand how British titles work. But it's 100 percent true that Prince William is also called Baron Carrickfergus. (You may Google that. I'll wait.)

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The Two-Way
3:02 am
Mon July 22, 2013

VIDEO: 'Grandma Drummer' Says She Loves To Play

"Grandma Drummer" — Mary Hvizda — in action.
Coalition Drum Shop video

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 3:52 am

We can't start the new week without posting more video of the "grandma drummer" who captured so much attention on Friday.

As we said in an update Saturday, the mystery woman who became a YouTube hit thanks to video of her rocking out at a La Cross, Wis., drum shop has been ID'd as Mary Hvizda, 63, of Onalaska, Wis.

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The Two-Way
2:42 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Book News: Scrapbooks Of Hemingway's Childhood Made Public

Ernest Hemingway was nearly as famous as a hunter and fisherman as he was a writer.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
2:40 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Dozens Killed, Hundreds Injured By Earthquakes In China

Rescuers clear debris Monday in China's Gansu province, where dozens of people were killed when earthquakes struck the region.
Guo Gang Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 3:50 am

The death toll is climbing after two earthquakes that struck western China early Monday.

More than 70 people are dead and at least 400 others are injured in Gansu province, the BBC says. According to The Associated Press, China's state media say the death toll stands at 75.

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The Two-Way
2:08 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Search For More Murder Victims Ends In Cleveland Suburb

Police tape outside a garage in East Cleveland, Ohio. A woman's body was found inside. Two other victims were also discovered in the neighborhood.
Kim Palmer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 2:04 pm

The search for more more bodies ended late Sunday in a Cleveland suburb where the remains of three women were found wrapped in plastic over the weekend.

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Sports
1:44 am
Mon July 22, 2013

In The Tour De France, Even The Loser Is A Winner

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 2:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The winner of the Tour de France gets a yellow jersey but let's focus now on the lanterne rouge. That's the term for the guy who finishes last. It translates to red lantern, like that found on the caboose of a train. Yesterday, 36-year-old Canadian Svein Tuft took the honor with his 169th place finish. It turns out that the lanterne rouge is hotly contested. Just finishing brings glory and lucrative appearances. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
1:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Royal Arrival: It's A Boy!

Crowds of tourists gather on the steps of the Queen Victoria Memorial Statue outside Buckingham Palace in central London on Monday.
Justin Tallis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 1:55 pm

The Duchess of Cambridge, better known to most of the world as the former Kate Middleton, has given birth to a baby boy, the crown announced in a press release.

The baby was born at 4:24 p.m., London time on Monday, and weighed 8 pounds 6 ounces. The baby, whose name we still don't know, is third in line for the throne.

The announcement continues:

"The Duke of Cambridge [Prince William] was present for the birth.

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World
1:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Septuagenarian Superhero? Man Lifts Car Off Son-In-Law

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 2:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a tale of neither a bird nor a plane. Cecil Stuckless was fixing a Jeep in Salvage, Newfoundland with his son-in-law, who was working under the car. Stuckless told the CBC he was getting a tool when the car suddenly fell. He summoned all his strength and lifted the Jeep just enough to save his son-in-law. Impressive for anybody, let alone a 72-year-old.

Asked if he was Superman, Cecil said: No, I'm not super. I just did what I could.

NPR Story
12:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Encore: The Many Musical Careers Of Katie Crutchfield

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 3:04 am

Alabama-born singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield broke through to a bigger audience last year by releasing an aching, bare-bones solo album. Her follow-up album came out in March. (This story originally aired on Weekend Edition Sunday on June 23, 2013.)

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NPR Story
12:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Energy Standards For Ceiling Fans Spin Up D.C. Debate

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 6:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In these dog days of summer, a ceiling fan still offers an inexpensive way to cool down - except maybe in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C., where a partisan battle is heating up over efficiency standards proposed by the Obama administration. The Energy Department is in the early stages of crafting new rules to encourage the spread of ceiling fans that use less electricity, but House Republicans want to put that idea on ice. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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NPR Story
12:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Abortion Laws Differ From Doctors In Defining 20 Weeks

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 5:30 am

Texas last week became the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks. But most of the state laws don't define 20 weeks the same way doctors do.

Parallels
10:34 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Brazil's Evangelicals A Growing Force In Prayer, Politics

Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013.
Nelson Antoine AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:32 am

Pope Francis arrives Monday evening in Rio de Janeiro for a weeklong visit celebrating World Youth Day. Hundreds of thousands of Catholics have made the pilgrimage to see the Argentine-born pontiff, and he is expected to receive a rapturous welcome.

Still, Pope Francis's visit comes at a delicate time for the church in Brazil. Catholicism — the nation's main religion — is facing a huge challenge from evangelicals.

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The Salt
10:33 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:30 am

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
10:32 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Little Bighorn Tour Guide Brings Battle To Life

Seasonal Ranger Mike Donahue (right) discuses the Battle of Little Bighorn with Jon Jones atop Custer Hill.
Jim Kent NPR

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:04 am

On a scorching hot summer afternoon along the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, seasonal ranger Mike Donahue brings the historical Battle of Little Bighorn to life with remarkable enthusiasm and passion.

At a recent presentation, Donahue welcomes a crowd to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. "Why did it happen in the first place?" he asks during the presentation. "Because you had two peoples that really didn't understand or appreciate one another very well."

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Shots - Health News
10:31 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 12:07 pm

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes living all over our bodies has almost completely turned around. Now scientists say that not only are those microbes often not harmful, we can't live without them.

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Parallels
10:17 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Would Brits Throw Out Royals With Baby's Bathwater?

Cards depicting the 'royal baby' either as a boy or a girl, specially made by a games company as a publicity stunt are pictured, backdropped by members of the media waiting across the St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London on July 11, 2013.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

"Royal Baby Fever" is gripping Britain.

So say the breathless TV pundits gathered from round the world to report the infant's arrival.

Is it true?

An Ipsos Mori poll published this week found the Royal Family's certainly enjoying a golden age, after rebounding from the disasters of the 1990s — including the death of Princess Diana.

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