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Shots - Health News
7:10 am
Thu July 25, 2013

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Jonathan Saruk International Medical Corps

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:24 pm

  • Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives' jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

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Music
7:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Hip-Hop Sign Language Is Hard Work

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, having honest conversations about race can require a lot of patience, but the writer behind the "Yo, Is This Racist?" blog says there's value in getting angry and even profane in those debates.

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Politics
7:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Talks Income Gap: New Ideas About Old Problems?

President Obama's economic speaking tour seems reminiscent of campaign speeches in 2008. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's Ron Elving why the White House is sending this message again.

Economy
7:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Economics: Growing 'From The Middle Class Out'

President Obama is putting out a message of economic revitalization, starting with the middle class. Cecilia Munoz, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, explains why the executive branch is pushing the message now. She speaks with guest host Celeste Headleee.

The Two-Way
6:59 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Fire Going Out, Gas Leak Blocked At Gulf Of Mexico Rig

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:16 am

"Natural gas has stopped flowing to a drilling rig on fire in the Gulf of Mexico," NPR's Jeff Brady tells our Newscast Desk.

As he reports:

"A drilling crew lost control of the well on Tuesday, then gas escaping from the well caught fire. No one was injured, but the flames heavily damaged a drilling rig owned by Houston-based Hercules Offshore.

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The Salt
6:59 am
Thu July 25, 2013

The FDA Doesn't Want Chickens To Explore The Great Outdoors

Free-range chickens feed in a pasture on an organic farm in Illinois.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:51 am

Organic egg farmers are divided in their reaction to a new FDA proposal that's intended to reduce the risk of salmonella infection among free-roaming chickens. They even disagree about what the document, called "Guidance for Industry," actually requires.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Reports: Virginia Johnson, Of 'Masters & Johnson' Fame, Dies

Virginia Johnson and her then-husband, William Masters, in 1972. They studied sexual behavior for decades. She died this week in St. Louis. Masters died in 2001.
AP

"Virginia Johnson, one half of the famed Masters and Johnson research team on human sexual behavior, has died at the age of 88, her son, Scott, tells St. Louis Public Radio."

The station adds that "Johnson was a resident of The Altenheim [a retirement home] in St. Louis, and the facility has also confirmed her death."

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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Feds Charge SAC Capital In Insider Trading Case

Former SAC portfolio manager Michael Steinberg (center) exits a Manhattan federal court with his attorney after his indictment on securities fraud charges in March.
Louis Lanzano AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:29 am

Federal officials in New York City have charged SAC Capital Advisors with insider trading, the culmination of a protracted investigation into the hedge fund founded by embattled billionaire Steven Cohen.

SAC is charged with one count of wire fraud and four counts of securities fraud in connection with alleged insider trading by "numerous employees" at "various times between in or about 1999 through at least in or about 2010," according to the indictment.

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The Two-Way
5:42 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Big Coup For One Of The Big Three: Impala Called Best Sedan

The 2014 Chevrolet Impala, which Consumer Reports says its better than its foreign rivals.
Justin Lane EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:12 am

The city of Detroit may be on the skids financially, but one of its traditional "big three" automakers just scored a big win.

For the first time since it began making such comparisons between sedans in 1992, Consumer Reports magazine has given its top rating to a model made by a U.S. automaker — not one made by a European or Japanese company.

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The Two-Way
3:49 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week; Key Orders Up In June

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:04 am

There were 343,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, the Employment and Training Administration says. That was up from an estimated 336,000 the week before.

The increase is from what had been a 10-week low. But basically, claims have been ranging between the mid-330,000s and mid-370,000s all year. Like other employment indicators, the jobless claims figures have been signalling that job growth remains modest.

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The Two-Way
3:26 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Top Stories: Deadly Train Crash; Manning Trial Nears End

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:02 am

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Shots - Health News
2:48 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Hackers Track Their Vital Signs. Sounds Cool, But TMI?

Christopher Hopkins feels amazing, and he's got the data to prove it.
Courtesy of Christopher Hopkins

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

Large-scale data mining in health care sounds scary, but dial back that fear for a minute. What about mining your own data to make informed decisions about your day-to-day health?

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The Two-Way
2:26 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Bo Xilai, Disgraced Chinese Official, Is Indicted

Before his fall: Bo Xilai in 2010.
Jason Lee Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:01 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn speaks with Renee Montagne about the case against Bo Xilai

Bo Xilai, a rising star among China's political elite until his career collapsed in early 2012 after his wife was connected to the murder of a British businessman, was charged Thursday "with taking bribes, embezzlement and abuse of power," China's Xinhua News writes.

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The Two-Way
2:25 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Book News: Jane Austen To Replace Darwin On The 10-Pound Note

The governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, displays the concept design for the new 10-pound banknote featuring author Jane Austen.
Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:27 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
1:40 am
Thu July 25, 2013

'Scene From Hell' At Site Of Spanish Train Crash

Some of the wreckage at the site of Wednesday's train crash near Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
Miguel Vidal Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:50 am

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Around the Nation
12:58 am
Thu July 25, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves Head In Support Of Ill Toddler

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Former President George H.W. Bush has a new summer 'do. He shaved his head to show support for the son of one of his Secret Service agents. Two-year-old Patrick lost his hair from leukemia treatments. Bush and his wife lost a three-year-old daughter to leukemia nearly 60 years ago. A photo just released shows Patrick perched on Bush's knee with matching bald heads, blue shirts, and khakis. Bill Clinton tweeted: 41, you look great. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
12:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Believe In Fortune Cookie Predictions? After This, You Might

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK. Next time you open a fortune cookie, you might want to give the message careful consideration. Last week, after dinner out with his wife, William Johnson cracked open a fortune cookie. The little piece of paper inside told him: You will soon come into a lot of gold. The Southwick, Massachusetts man went out the next day, he bought a lottery ticket. He scratched it off, and the prize wasn't gold, but he could use it to buy a lot. He won a million dollars.

The Two-Way
12:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Steam And Groundwater Raise Concern At Japanese Nuclear Plant

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) workers work on waste water tanks at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in the town of Okuma, Fukushima prefecture in Japan on June 12, 2013.
Noboru Hashimoto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:01 am

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NPR Story
12:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Making Sense Of Cleveland's Good And Bad News

The new Cleveland Convention Center is hosting its first major event, the National Senior Games.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:13 am

As Cleveland embraces national attention for everything from its booming arts and culinary scene to its redevelopment plans, it struggles with recent high-profile crimes. Some residents and tourists are left with news whiplash as they try to figure out what these diverging storylines say about the city.

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NPR Story
12:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Collecting Taxes Among Detroit's Financial Troubles

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Detroit is broke. But a federal judge is holding hearings to determine whether Detroit is broke enough to qualify for bankruptcy protection. The court is examining whether the city has done everything possible to put more money in its coffers. Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET reports one thing is certain - Detroit is struggling to bring into its coffers tax revenue.

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NPR Story
12:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Train Derailment Kills Scores In Spain

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:08 am

At least 78 people have died and more than 140 others have been injured after a train derailment in Spain. The high-speed train, carrying 218 passengers plus its crew, left the tracks as it went around a curve near the city of Santiago de Compostela. David Greene talks to Lisa Abend, who reports for Time magazine, for the latest.

Code Switch
10:41 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

After Years Of Violence, L.A.'s Watts Sees Crime Subside

Los Angeles police officers take a break during a basketball game with residents of the Nickerson Gardens housing project in July 2011. Violent crime at Nickerson Gardens and two nearby housing projects has fallen by almost half since 2010.
Thomas Watkins AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:48 am

On most weeknights, in the middle of his shift, Los Angeles police officer Keith Mott trades his gun and uniform for a T-shirt and shorts, and heads to a park in the Watts neighborhood of South Los Angeles. He's there to coach 7- and 8-year-old boys on the Pop Warner Pee Wee football team, the Watts Bears.

The kids come from three nearby housing projects: Jordan Downs, Nickerson Gardens and Imperial Courts. The park was carefully chosen. It's a neutral site for local gangs. Otherwise, most of the Bears' parents wouldn't allow them to come and play.

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Parallels
10:40 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

South Africans Ponder A Nation Without Mandela

A well-wisher uses his phone to take a picture of a banner of photos of Nelson Mandela outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, where the former South African president is being treated.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 2:10 pm

From the township of Alexandra in Johannesburg, shack dwellers can look across a ravine to the spires of Sandton City, which houses the most lavish shopping mall in sub-Saharan Africa.

Alex, as this slum of roughly a half a million people is known, was home to Nelson Mandela when he first moved to Johannesburg in 1941.

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Environment
10:38 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 6:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

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Deceptive Cadence
9:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

The High, Heavenly Voice Of David Daniels

Countertenor David Daniels (right) and dancer Reed Luplau in the Santa Fe Opera's world-premiere production of Oscar, based on the life of Oscar Wilde.
Ken Howard Santa Fe Opera

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 4:19 am

"You very quickly forget whether it's a male voice or a female voice. ... Because he's such a terrific musician, and so expressive, the fact that it's a man singing in a woman's range becomes irrelevant, and what we hear is the music."

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It's All Politics
2:42 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

King Wing Presents Both A Problem And An Opportunity For GOP

Rep. Steve King, an Iowa Republican, is taking heat for comparing many young immigrant DREAMers to drug mules.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:37 am

Both for the Republican Party, in general, and the GOP House leadership, in particular, Rep. Steve King's controversial comments about young immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally are a setback, to put it mildly.

King, as anyone knows who hasn't been single-mindedly focused in recent days on the birth of Prince George Alexander, caused a sizable ruckus with comments that are being called "hateful," "inexcusable" and "reprehensible" — even by some of his fellow House Republicans.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves His Head In Support Of Ailing Boy

George H.W. Bush with Patrick, the two-year-old son of one of the members of his security detail.
Office of George H.W. Bush

In a very sweet gesture, President George H.W. Bush shaved his head to show solidarity for Patrick, the two-year-old son of one of the members of his Secret Service detail.

Patrick, Bush's spokesman Jim McGrath said on Twitter, is undergoing treatment for leukemia, so he lost his hair.

McGrath tweeted this picture of Bush with the little guy:

And this one of Patrick with Bush and the entire Secret Service detail:

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Europe
2:21 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Royals Reveal New Baby's Name

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Finally this hour, the news that some of you at least have been anxiously awaiting. The royal baby has a name, several of them, in fact. George Alexander Louis. We'll break down that monitor for you now.

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National Security
2:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

House Rejects Measure That Would Have Curbed NSA Program

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

On Capitol Hill, an effort to limit the authority of the National Security Agency has fallen short. It was the first chance for House lawmakers to vote on the government's phone surveillance program since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. They rejected an amendment that the White House and top intelligence officials had lobbied hard against.

NPR's Tamara Keith joins us from Capitol Hill. And, Tamara, the amendment was defeated. How close was it?

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Train Derailment In Spain Leaves Dozens Dead

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 10:22 pm

Update at 3:20 a.m. Thursday: Death Toll Rises

The Associated Press reports that 77 people were killed when a train derailed in northwestern Spain, according to Maria Pardo Rios, spokeswoman for the Galicia region's main court. Four died at hospitals, while 73 were found dead at the scene, she said.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Spanish newspaper El País paints a bloody picture of the scene of a train derailment in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, on Wednesday.

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