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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Shinseki: Shutdown Means Veterans Will Not Get Benefits

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifies on Capitol Hill in April.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 9:40 am

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki warned lawmakers on Wednesday that the partial government shutdown means that about 3.8 million veterans will not receive disability compensation next month.

Shinseki, in testimony before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, said pensions to more than half a million vets or surviving spouses will also be derailed if the stalemate over a temporary spending measure drags on into late October.

The Associated Press reports:

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The Salt
9:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Meet Dave, A 19-Year-Old Craft Beer With A $2,000 Price Tag

Hair of the Dog releases a few bottles of Dave a year. In September, the 12 bottles of Dave on sale for $2,000 apiece sold out within a few hours.
Courtesy of Alan Sprints

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 1:00 pm

Hair of the Dog Brewery in Portland, Ore., makes a beer so rare, and so sought after, that it can fetch $2,000 a bottle.

It's called Dave. And no, it's not something out of a Portlandia sketch.

Dave is a barleywine — a strong, dark beer with 29 percent alcohol content. It's been aged for 19 years, first in oak barrels and then glass bottles.

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The Government Shutdown
9:07 am
Wed October 9, 2013

How The Shutdown Is Hurting The Housing Market

If interest rates go up due to the fear or reality of a debt default that would have major consequences for real estate sales.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 3:57 am

As with so many other types of economic activity, the government shutdown is causing more fear than actual harm in the housing market thus far.

But that doesn't mean things won't start going wrong in the very near future.

Various federal agencies play greater or lesser roles in real estate transactions. With most of them sidelined, simple matters such as closing on mortgages are becoming more complicated.

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The Salt
9:02 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Sweet. Tart. Crunchy: How To Engineer A Better Apple

The just-released Riverbelle is one of well over 100 new apple varieties to hit markets around the world in the past six years.
Courtesy of Honeybear Brands

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 11:04 am

Browsing farmers markets this fall, you may find some new apple varieties mixed in with the Granny Smiths, McIntoshes and Fujis. Susan Brown, head of the apple breeding program at Cornell University, estimates that there have been 130 new apples released around the world in the past six years.

This summer, she contributed two more to that tally: the SnapDragon and the Ruby Frost.

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It's All Politics
9:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

President Obama's 'It's Good To Be The King' Moment

President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner sit together at a Capitol event in February dedicating a statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:05 pm

It is good to be the king.

That old adage holds, even though nowadays we call our chief executive "Mr. President."

After another long day of showdown over the shutdown, President Obama was able to dominate the headlines, break the tension and change the atmosphere in Washington. He could demonstrate everything that is different about being in the White House — as opposed to that other House where Speaker John Boehner lives.

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The Two-Way
8:30 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Jupiter Or Bust, But First A Quick Fly-By Of Home

NASA's flight path for its Juno space probe, which is expected to buzz Earth at 3:21 p.m. ET on Wednesday.
NASA

After traveling for more than two years and some 1 billion miles, NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter is back where it started. Almost. At 3:21 p.m. ET Wednesday, the Juno space probe will be 347 miles away from Earth, just above the southern tip of Africa.

(As an aside, at around 11:30 a.m. ET, it was more than 90,000 miles away.)

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Around the Nation
7:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Property Taxes May Cause Slaves' Descendants To Lose Homes

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now to a different story about the changing face of another historic community. Sapelo Island, just off the coast of Georgia, is home to one of the few remaining Gullah Geechee enclaves. These tight knit communities in the nation's South-East trace their roots back to slavery times and share a distinct culture and dialect. But now that's being threatened by a changing economy.

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Around the Nation
7:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Yuppie Condos Destroying Chinatowns?

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
7:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Janet Yellen's Resume Makes Us All Feel Like 'Slackers'

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we will talk about people and their attachment to the land in two very different places in the United States, and how that attachment to the land may be threatened.

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Politics
7:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Govt. Shutdown 'Wake-Up Call' To Native Americans

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The partial government shutdown is now into its ninth day. There's no sign of a breakthrough anytime soon. So we are going to look at a number of ways the country is being affected. Later in the program, we'll speak with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax about how this stalemate is playing out with our trading partners overseas.

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The Two-Way
5:58 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Boston School Bus Drivers Back Behind The Wheel After Strike

School buses sit idle in a lot at Veolia Transportation, Boston's school bus contractor, on Tuesday
Stephan Savoia AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:52 am

Hundreds of Boston school bus drivers are back on the job following a one-day strike that sent parents scrambling to find ways to get their kids to and from school.

The drivers' union said Wednesday that it had agreed to return to work after the company contracted by the school to run bus services, Veolia Transportation Inc., agreed to a meeting with the union. About 600 drivers had walked off the job.

Boston.com says:

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The Two-Way
5:41 am
Wed October 9, 2013

U.S. Suspending Millions In Military Aid To Egypt

Armored vehicles blocking Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, in August.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 12:36 pm

Update at 4:39 p.m. ET. Recalibrating Assistance:

The State Department says the U.S. is "recalibrating" the assistance it provides Egypt.

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Parallels
4:54 am
Wed October 9, 2013

A Recurring Tragedy: Death In A Bangladesh Garment Factory

A Bangladeshi firefighter stands inside a damaged garment factory after it caught fire in Gazipur outside the capital, Dhaka, on Wednesday. The fire killed at least 10 people at the factory.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:06 am

There's been a deadly fire at a garment factory in Bangladesh — the latest in a series of such tragedies and just six months after the worst disaster in the history of the global garment industry.

At least 10 people were killed at the Aswad garment factory outside the capital, Dhaka, early Wednesday. The immediate cause was not known. This factory, like others where tragedy has struck, produced clothes for a number of Western companies.

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Shots - Health News
4:32 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Nobel Goes To Scientists Who Took Chemistry Into Cyberspace

Classical mechanics, represented by Isaac Newton, typically doesn't play nicely with quantum mechanics, represented by Schrodinger's cat. But the 2013 Nobel laureates for chemistry figured out a way to get the two to work together.
Courtesy of the Nobel Prize

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:08 am

This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry is shared by three international scientists, who moved chemistry out of the lab and into the world of computing.

Together they developed tools for studying complex molecules — such as enzymes in the human body and plants' photosynthesis machinery — inside cyberspace.

These computerized tools allow scientists to design drugs more quickly and cheaply by doing their experiments with computer programs instead of inside rats and monkeys.

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The Two-Way
3:37 am
Wed October 9, 2013

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

The skies over the U.S. Capitol on Monday matched the mood as the partial government shutdown drags on and the nation edges closer to a possible default.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:53 am

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here's a rundown of Wednesday's Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

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The Two-Way
3:22 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Top Stories: Nobel In Chemistry; Yellen Gets Nod As Fed Chair

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:37 am

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It's All Politics
2:30 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Wednesday Morning Political Mix

President Obama gets some support outside the White House, Oct. 8, 2013.
JEWEL SAMAD AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:18 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies. It's Day 9 of the partial federal government shutdown. Global financial markets at this point still appear to expect sanity to eventually prevail in the Washington fiscal standoff. We'll have to see if they're right.

The day's big news is expected to be President Obama's choice to head the Federal Reserve of the candidate thought to be his second choice since his first proved politically problematic.

Here are some of the more interesting politically related items that caught my eye this morning.

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Around the Nation
2:28 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Chicago Company Aims To Popularize Electric Unicycle

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
2:17 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Starbucks Offers A Free Cup Of Coffee With A Condition

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with shutdown beverage news. New breweries cannot open. The partial government shutdown prevents the Treasury Department from approving them. You can still get coffee at Starbucks. CEO Howard Shultz, who spoke up for gun rights - then had to ask people to stop bringing guns to his stores - waded into politics again. He's urging people to talk to one another, offering free coffee if you buy someone a coffee - subsidized Starbucks conversation.

The Two-Way
2:08 am
Wed October 9, 2013

3 Scientists Win Chemistry Nobel For Complex Computer Modeling

A screenshot of the Nobel Prizes webpage showing the 2013 chemistry laureates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel.
Claudio Bresciani AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:34 am

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their development of powerful computer models used to simulate how chemical reactions work, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Wednesday.

The technology they pioneered is now used to develop drugs and to perform other vital tasks in the laboratory.

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Politics
11:36 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Rep. Labrador Of Idaho Weighs In On Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Research News
11:36 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

3 Scientists Share 2013 Nobel Prize For Chemistry

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be shared by three scientists who took chemistry inside the world of computing. This powerful technology is now used to develop drugs and perform all sorts of vital tasks in chemistry. The three winners were all born overseas but collaborated in the United States and elsewhere in the 1970s, where they started their work.

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Politics
11:36 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Federal Prison Workers Dismayed By Government Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Parallels
10:00 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

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Around the Nation
10:00 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

High-End Extras Aren't A Sure Bet For Tribal Casinos

Yvonne Smith is the director of La Rive Spa at Northern Quest Resort and Casino in Washington state. Across the country, Native American tribes are hoping high-end extras will draw visitors to casinos.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:53 am

What used to be no-frills slot parlors off the highway are turning into resort-style destinations with spas, golf courses and luxury hotels. Native American tribes are hoping these added amenities will give them an edge in an increasingly competitive gaming market.

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It's All Politics
9:58 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Booker Gets A Run For His Money In N.J. Senate Race

Democrat Cory Booker (left) and Republican Steve Lonegan stand together after their first debate in the race for U.S. Senate on Oct. 4 in Trenton, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:22 am

Cory Booker, the celebrity mayor of Newark, N.J., was expected to cruise to victory in the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Frank Lautenberg. But just a week before voters go to the polls, he's facing a surprisingly strong challenge from Tea Party favorite Steve Lonegan.

The race was supposed to be a mismatch: Booker, the Democrat, and his 1.4 million Twitter followers versus the Republican former mayor of Bogota, N.J. — population 8,000.

But no one told Lonegan.

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Shots - Health News
9:58 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

This micrograph shows a single mitochondrion (yellow), one of many little energy factories inside a cell.
Keith R. Porter Science Source

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:39 am

The federal government is considering whether to allow scientists to take a controversial step: make changes in some of the genetic material in a woman's egg that would be passed down through generations.

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Sweetness And Light
9:44 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe

Shadows of journalists are seen next to a FIFA logo after a recent press conference on controversy swirling around 2022 World Cup construction projects in Qatar.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:44 pm

Complain all you want about how sports in the U.S. are run, but the playing fields aren't always greener on the other side.

In Europe, FIFA, the soccer federation, is dealing with problems associated with the 2022 World Cup's timing and venue. For one, after awarding the World Cup to Qatar, those running FIFA wonder now if it'd be better to play the games in winter when it will be cooler — only that's when all the European leagues are operating.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Obama Will Tap Janet Yellen As Fed Chairwoman

Federal Reserve Vice Chair Janet Yellen speaks at an international monetary conference in Shanghai on June 3, 2013.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

The White House says President Obama intends to nominate Federal Reserve Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen to chair the Federal Reserve, once Ben Bernanke completes his term in January.

If confirmed, Yellen, 67, would be the first woman to head the American central bank.

Obama is scheduled to make the announcement at 3 p.m. ET. Wednesday.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

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NPR Story
2:24 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

White House: Obama To Tap Janet Yellen For Fed Chair

The White House announced Tuesday that President Obama will nominate Federal Reserve Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen to chair the Federal Reserve Wednesday. She would replace Ben Bernanke, who's stepping down from the post. Yellen has been the presumptive nominee for weeks, after Lawrence Summers announced his intention to remove himself from the running in September. She'd be the first woman to head the Fed.

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