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11:06 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Ole Miss Turns Scary Racial Incident Into Teachable Moment

Students at Ole Miss responded to the Nov. 6 rally with a candlelight walk the following evening.
Nathan Latil The University of Mississippi

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:12 pm

At new-student orientation this summer, University of Mississippi students are learning about the usual: meal plans and financial aid. But they're also hearing something else: a seminar born out of an incident on election night last November.

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All Tech Considered
11:06 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Tools To Help You Hide Online Raise The Ire Of Advertisers

People wait to attend a Mozilla press conference in Barcelona, Spain, in February. Mozilla's Firefox and other Web browsers allow users to opt out of third-party tracking cookies.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:12 pm

When Mozilla announced a plan to improve its system for blocking third-party cookies, it didn't seem like the kind of thing that would make waves. But it didn't take long for the Internet advertising industry to react — furiously.

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Shots - Health News
11:06 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Curing Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis In Kids Takes Creativity

Rukshona Saidova, 12, lives with both HIV and tuberculosis. She can't walk right now because the diseases have atrophied muscles in her legs.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:07 pm

The world is struggling to cope with a growing epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Treatment is even more complicated for children.

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NPR Story
11:06 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Transit Strike Sends Commuters Scrambling In San Francisco

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For two days now, about 400,000 commuters in the San Francisco Bay Area have had to find an alternate way to get around. Workers for the area's rail system are on strike. The dispute at Bay Area Rapid Transit, or BART, is over pay, benefit and safety issues. Employees walked off the job early Monday morning as their contract expired. For now, NPR's Richard Gonzales reports that most travelers are taking the disruption in stride.

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NPR Story
11:06 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Morsi Opponent: Muslim Brotherhood Still Needs A Place

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Amr Hamzawy is a founder of the Egyptian Freedom Party. The party is a member of the National Salvation Front, the coalition of groups opposed to President Morsi. He joins us now from Cairo. Welcome to the program once again, Dr. Hamzawy.

DR. AMR HAMZAWY: Thank you very much, Robert.

SIEGEL: And let me ask you first: Are there any talks right now between the National Salvation Front and President Morsi to reach an agreement that would avoid the military stepping in on Wednesday?

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Off The Rails: Strike-Hit Bay Area Struggles With 'Horrible' Commutes

Frustrated commuters wait at the Transbay Temporary Terminal in San Francisco to catch a bus over to Oakland on Tuesday.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:44 pm

Andrea Brearley's kids really want to see Pixar while on vacation. The problem is that the family is staying in San Francisco, and with rail workers on strike, they're having a hard time figuring out how to get to the cartoon-maker's headquarters across the bay in Emeryville, Calif.

Brearley, who lives in Windsor, Ontario, says it's been "scary" trying to figure out an alternative route. "Three different people told me three different buses," she says.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Felony Arrest Of Student Who Bought Water Riles Many In Virginia

A college student spent the night in jail and was charged with felony counts after agents approached her car, suspecting she bought beer at this Harris Teeter grocery store in Charlottesville, Va.
Google

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:27 pm

"We're the police."

"This is bottled water."

If an encounter between several young women and Virginia's Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control agents had gone that smoothly, the participants might be looking back on a chance encounter as merely odd, perhaps even funny. Instead, they're coping with the aftermath of a brief flight from authorities that resulted in spending a night in jail and felony charges, now dropped, of hitting agents with a car. The state agency says it's reviewing the case.

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Parallels
9:15 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Who's Who In The Egyptian Crisis

Before The Fall: Then-Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) met Monday with Prime Minister Hesham Kandil (center) and Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi in Cairo. Since then, the military has ousted Morsi, suspended the constitution and imposed a "road map" for political transition in Egypt after the president refused calls to step down.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 12:46 pm

This story, which was originally posted on July 2, has been updated to reflect the events in Egypt today.

After days of growing protests across Egypt, the military has removed embattled President Mohammed Morsi and suspended the country's constitution, paving the way for an interim government ahead of early presidential elections.

Two years ago, during Egypt's 2011 revolution, the storyline was simple. A broad cross section of Egyptians took to the streets to demand the removal of Hosni Mubarak, the president who had been in power for three decades.

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The Salt
8:52 am
Tue July 2, 2013

'Heart Attack On A Hook': Meet America's 'Worst Restaurant Meal'

Long John Silver's Big Catch platter will net you 33 grams of trans fats in one meal.
Courtesy of Clare Politano Center for Science in the Public Interest

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:19 am

Seafood is generally considered a more healthful choice when dining out — but not if you're battering and deep-frying it and serving it up with hush puppies and onion rings.

And that is precisely why the folks at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nutrition and health policy watchdog group, have named Long John Silver's new "Big Catch" meal the worst restaurant meal in America.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Tue July 2, 2013

His Son Is 'A Modern Day Paul Revere,' Snowden's Father Says

Declaring that "you are a modern day Paul Revere; summoning the American people to confront the growing danger of tyranny and one-branch government," the father of "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden on Tuesday released an open letter to his son.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Why The Fort Hood Suspect Couldn't Plead Guilty To Murder

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood. A Muslim, he has refused a judge's order to shave his beard, though it violates Army regulations. The trial will proceed, however.
Bell County Sheriff's Office Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:07 am

(Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET.)

Nearly four years after the mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, in which 13 people were killed and 32 were wounded, the case against the Army psychiatrist who stands accused of the crimes got to the pleading stage Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Baikonour, We Have A Problem. Russian Rocket Crashes And Burns

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 10:38 am

Update at 3:25 p.m. ET on July 10.

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Remembrances
7:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Remembering William Gray: A Mentor To Many

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to take a minute to say goodbye to an important figure in American politics and education. Former Congressman William Gray III died yesterday at the age of 71. Gray was a Democrat who represented Pennsylvania's 2nd District from 1979 to 1992. He was the first African-American to serve as majority whip in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Parenting
7:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Avoiding The Post-Millennial Mid-Life Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 4:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, as we broadcast from the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colorado we decided to talk about new ideas about how young people can make the most of their 20s.

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Afghanistan
7:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Afghan Woman Fights For Women's Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to bring you the story of one young woman for whom going to school was literally an act of courage. Shabana Basij-Rasikh was six when the Taliban took over in Afghanistan. They made it illegal for girls to go to school. As a result, for years, Shabana and her sister put their lives on the line to go to a secret school in Kabul. Her persistence and bravery eventually led her to Middlebury College, where she graduated magna cum laude in 2010.

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Education
7:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Hot Tips To Reinvent Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we will hear the story of one young woman who literally put her life on the line to go to school. Shabana Basij-Rasikh will join us to talk about growing up under Taliban rule in Afghanistan and the work she's doing now to make sure other young Afghan women can get an education. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we are continuing our conversation with our education innovators.

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Education
7:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Educational Innovators Ask 'Why Can't Learning Be Fun?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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It's All Politics
7:26 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:32 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

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Shots - Health News
7:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Federal Rule Extends Subsidies For College Students

Students at Yale University and several other schools that are self-insured will qualify for subsidies under the federal health law after all.
Christopher Capozziello Getty Images

Beginning in 2014, most people, including students, will have to have health insurance, whether or not they are claimed as a dependent on their parents' tax returns.

The federal health law says if they don't, they or their parents will face penalties.

While expansion of coverage under the health law has helped about 3 million young people get insurance through their parents' plans, many remain uninsured or have coverage through student health plans.

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Parallels
6:59 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 2:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

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The Two-Way
6:51 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Jailed Tunisian Rapper Is Freed; Song Called Police 'Dogs'

Tunisian rapper Ala Yaacoubi, also known by his rap name Weld El 15, left, speaks alongside his lawyer, Ghazi Mrabet, before his trial last month.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 10:29 am

A Tunisian appeals court has freed rapper Ala Yaacoubi, who last month was sentenced to two years in prison for insulting police officers with his song "The Police Are Dogs."

Critics had said the arrest of Yaacoubi, 25, who performs under the name Weld El 15, was a sign of repression in Tunisia, where mass rallies overthrew former leader Zine El Abidine Ben Ali at the start of the Arab Spring in 2011. As NPR reported that summer, several rap songs became anthems for that shift.

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The Two-Way
3:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Top Stories: Fallen Firefighters Honored; Heat Wave Continues

Oh, baby it's hot: The sun shines down on people standing atop the roof of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, one of the cities in the grips of a dangerous heat wave.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:44 am

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The Two-Way
3:13 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Book News: Neil Gaiman Revives 'Sandman' Comic Series

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
3:07 am
Tue July 2, 2013

VIDEOS: Solemn Salutes To Fallen Firefighters In Arizona

Holding on to each other: Firefighters hug during a memorial service Monday in Prescott, Ariz. They were honoring 19 others who died Sunday.
Michael Nelson EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:43 am

The simple, sobering sound of a bell ringing as each firefighter's name and age was read brings home the sad story from Prescott, Ariz., where 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who died Sunday fighting a wildfire were remembered Monday.

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The Two-Way
2:34 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Pressure Builds On Egypt's Morsi To Compromise Or Step Down

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square again Monday during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohamed El-Shahed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:37 am

With about 24 hours to go before the deadline set by Egypt's military to work with opponents and craft a roadmap that moves the country past its political problems or have one created for him by the army, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is under intense pressure. He must either "reach some kind of compromise" with those protesting against his government "or step aside," NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson tells our Newscast Desk.

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Around the Nation
2:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Sign Maker Misspells Florida, Twice

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Florida's Department of Transportation ordered a new sign for Interstate 95. It read: Exit 344, University of Florida, Florida State College South Campus. Only one issue. Both times, Florida was spelled wrong. It read: Flordia. The sign manufacturer in Arkansas made that mistake. According to First Coast News, the company has agreed to fix the sign for free. They also might want to get off at that exit and head back to school.

Europe
2:17 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Imagine 'Star Wars' Taking Place In Elizabethan England

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Imagine if "Star Wars" took place not in a galaxy far, far away, but in Elizabethan England. Darth Vader and Obi-Wan Kenobi's final exchange might sound like...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In time, thy powers have weak become, old man.

MONTAGNE: And yes, thou canst not win all warrant, Darth.

Out today, "William Shakespeare's Star Wars," as told by the Bard. And author Ian Doescher aims for a sequel: "The Empire Striketh Back."

The Two-Way
2:00 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Snowden Seeks Asylum In 20-Plus Nations, Gives Up On Russia

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:54 am

With help from a WikiLeaks lawyer, the young American who admits he leaked information about National Security Agency surveillance programs has now asked more than 20 nations to give him asylum.

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Parallels
1:51 am
Tue July 2, 2013

New Kind Of Ikea Hack: Flat-Packs Head To Refugee Camps

Check out the video at the bottom of the page to see how this box transforms ...
Ikea Foundation

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:20 am

My name is Maureen, and I am an Ikea-holic. Sure, I laughed knowingly at The Narrator's "slave to Ikea" speech as much as the next Fight Club fan. But the awful truth is, I've got a Beddinge in my bedroom.

And I'm not embarrassed to say so.

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Politics
11:45 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Texas Democrats See Opportunity In Changing Demographics

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All week, we are looking at demographic changes in the currently very red, very Republican Lone Star state. Democrats hope the growing size and potential voting clout of the Latin population will turn Texas blue.

Whether that happens or not, the Texas Democratic Party already bears little resemblance to what it looked like when it last dominated Texas politics decades ago.

NPR's Don Gonyea brings us the latest in our series Texas 2020.

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