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Middle East
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Peaceful Protest Over Istanbul Park Turns Violent

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:55 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is Weekend Edition from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF RIOTING)

SIMON: Turkish riot police fired tear gas and water cannons on demonstrators in downtown Istanbul during a second day of protests. The clashes were triggered by the government's plan to build a shopping mall in a downtown park. Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan has called for an immediate end to the protest. NPR's Peter Kenyon joins us from Istanbul. Peter, thanks for being with us.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

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Politics
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

What's On Obama's Agenda With China's President?

Next week, President Obama will meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at an estate in California. Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon speaks with Ken Lieberthal of the Brookings Institution about what issues the two world leaders are likely to discuss.

World
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Sandwich Throwing: Australian For Protest

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

People might not want to stand near Australia's Prime Minister Julia Gillard if they want to keep their suit clean, but if they want a snack.... Earlier this month, someone hurled a sandwich slathered in Vegemite, the yeast extract that's Australia's national spread, at the prime minister. It missed by a wide mark. A student was suspended for 15 days, but he denies being the culprit.

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Sports
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Week In Sports: Who Will Face The Spurs For The NBA Title?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

From politics to sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: We've got conference championships going on in basketball and hockey. Can the Heat burn off the Pacers? Will this be the last rodeo for a great Spurs franchise or another gold ring? And four former champions are on ice in the NHL. Howard Bryant of ESPN The Magazine, the TV network and the website and the virgin cold-pressed olive oil joins us from the studios of New England Public Radio in Amherst. Howard, thank so much for being with us.

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Pop Culture
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

How To Speak Teen

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 4:11 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Teenagers can seem sullen, moody and uncommunicative, unless you know how to listen to them. James Harbeck does. He's an editor and linguist in Canada who's analyzed sounds that can be distinctly annoying to adults. James Harbeck joins us from the studios of the CBC in Toronto. Thanks so much for being with us.

JAMES HARBECK: Hi. Nice to be here.

SIMON: First, what made you devote any scholarship to this?

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Around the Nation
1:39 am
Sat June 1, 2013

More Storms, Tornadoes Batter Parts Of Oklahoma

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Parallels
12:30 am
Sat June 1, 2013

After Years Of War, Ugandan Children Face New Deadly Threat

Grace Aber stands in the shade of a mango tree with her children in the remote village of Tumangu in northern Uganda. Four of Aber's nine children have been diagnosed with nodding syndrome, starting with Partick (front), who first showed symptoms in 2002.
Matthew Kielty for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 3:27 am

The village of Tumangu, in northern Uganda, defines remote. It's hard even to find on maps. But it shows up frequently in news stories. Grace Aber is about to show me why.

She leads me down a narrow dirt path, passing a couple of clay huts. We get to a big mango tree. Aber's 17-year-old son, Patrick, sits under it. His shoulders are slouched. His eyes look like glass.

Aber tries to get him to say his name. A small grunt is the only sound he makes.

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Simon Says
12:29 am
Sat June 1, 2013

High School Newspapers: An Endangered Species

Student newspapers may be the latest victims of social media.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 9:49 am

Does your local high school have a student newspaper? And in this day when a social media message saying, "Tonight's Green Design and Technology class homework sucks!" can instantly be sent to thousands, does it need to?

The New York Times reports this week that only 1 in 8 of New York's public high schools has a student newspaper — and many of those are published just a few times a year. A few more are online, which can leave out poorer schools.

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The Picture Show
12:29 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Documenting America's Environments: Then And Now

East Boston, Mass., in 1973 (left) and in 2012.
Michael P. Manheim Environmental Protection Agency

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 9:26 am

In 1971, when the Environmental Protection Agency was in its early days, someone at the agency got the idea to send nearly 100 freelance photographers around America to document the country. These weren't postcard shots, but pictures of street corners, freight yards, parking lots, alleyways — wherever people were working and living. It was called Documerica, and it went on for seven years.

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It's All Politics
12:23 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Obama's Economic View: A Glass Half-Full And Half-Empty

President Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on Friday. He said the economy is seeing progress but added that too many people are still struggling.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 1:39 am

It has been a good week for economic news. Here's a quick rundown of the positive signs: Home prices showed their best gains in seven years. Consumer confidence hit a five-year high. The stock market set a new record. All just this week.

"We're seeing progress," President Obama said in the White House Rose Garden on Friday morning, "and the economy is starting to pick up steam. The gears are starting to turn again, and we're getting some traction."

You could tell from the tone of his voice that he was leading up to a "but."

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The Salt
12:21 am
Sat June 1, 2013

France Sells Presidential Wines To Update Palace Wine Cellar

French President Francois Hollande's palace has decided to dive into its wine cellar and sell some of its treasures to raise money and replenish its collection with more modest vintages. About 1,200 bottles, a 10th of the Elysee's wine collection, are being sold at the Drouot auction house in Paris this week.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:46 am

Prized Burgundies and Bordeaux once served at the presidential palace in France were sold for the first time ever as the wine cellar at Elysee Palace gets an overhaul.

Some 1,200 bottles, or 10 percent of the palace wines, went on sale this week at the famous Drouot auction house in downtown Paris. On the block were vintages from 1930 to 1990, including famous names such as Chateau Latour, Chateau Mouton Rothschild and Montrachet.

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Music Interviews
9:03 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

City And Colour: A Musician Unplugs To Make A Connection

Dallas Green, once a member of the post-hardcore group Alexisonfire, now makes much quieter music as City and Colour. His fourth solo album is The Hurry and the Harm.
Dustin Rabin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:21 am

City and Colour is the stage name of Canadian singer-songwriter Dallas Green. Once upon a time, he was a member of the post-hardcore band Alexisonfire, which self-identified as "the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife fight." But Green had a different side to him, too.

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Around the Nation
4:23 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Tornadoes Again Threaten Oklahoma City

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. It has been another day of terrible tornadoes in Oklahoma. Supercells have moved across the state focusing their fury on the Oklahoma City metro area. It was just two weeks ago that another tornado devastated the city of Moore, killing 24 people.

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Sports
1:59 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

What A Lawsuit Against The Redskins Could Mean For The Brand

Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder has vowed to never change the team's name.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

Once again, the long-standing controversy over the name of the Washington Redskins is in the news. In May, 10 members of Congress sent a letter to the team's owner and several others urging a name change.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Firefighters Killed In Houston Motel Blaze

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 1:53 pm

Four firefighters have been killed battling a five-alarm fire at a Houston motel. At least five others have been injured.

The Houston mayor's office confirmed the dead and injured after firefighters responded to the massive blaze at the Southwest Inn shortly after noon. The fire reportedly began at a restaurant and then "flames spread to the motel and were shooting from the roof before firefighters extinguished the blaze," The Associated Press reports.

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Shots - Health News
12:54 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

D.C. Agency Approves 2 High-Tech Cancer Centers

After months of heated debate, two of the biggest hospital systems in Washington, D.C., won approval Friday to build expensive proton beam centers for cancer treatment.

Together, the two high-tech expansions are expected to cost $153 million. The green light comes despite questions about whether the proton beam treatment is more effective than less expensive options.

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Around the Nation
12:49 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

In Ohio Town, Okla. Twister Conjures Echoes Of 1974 Disaster

In 1974, a young Xenia, Ohio, resident sweeps the slab of a house that was destroyed in a tornado that struck the town April 3.
AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

When a tornado roars into a populated area, the change is often drastic and deadly, and it happens within minutes. As the people of Oklahoma struggle to look beyond this month's devastating storms, residents of Xenia, Ohio, are reflecting on the tornado of 1974.

Xenia, in southwest Ohio near Dayton, became well-known to the nation that year. "Everywhere I go, and I've been all over the U.S., if I say I'm from Xenia people say, 'tornado,' " says Catherine Wilson, who runs the historical society in Xenia. She still gets a lot of questions about the twister.

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Shots - Health News
12:49 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Survivor Of Boston Marathon Bombings Has Long Road Ahead

Jen Regan strokes the head of her fiancée, Marc Fucarile, as he sleeps in his hospital bed at Massachusetts General Hospital. Fucarile was injured in the bombings at the Boston Marathon, and had to have his right leg amputated.
Bill Greene Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 5:41 am

Marc Fucarile reached a huge milestone this week: He was one of the last two Boston Marathon bombing survivors to be released from the hospital.

Fucarile spent 45 days in Massachusetts General Hospital, and he hopes someday to get back to work with a roofing company.

But first he will have to go through rehab. He lost his right leg, and his left leg was badly hurt. He also suffered head injuries.

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The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

U.S., Russia At Odds Over Moscow's Plan To Arm Syria

A MIG-29 and its armaments on display at the military aerodrome at Vasylkiv near Kiev, Ukraine.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 1:48 pm

Russian media has hinted that Moscow could speed up delivery of S-300 surface-to-air missiles to Syria if the U.S. and its allies decide to impose a no-fly zone to aid rebels there. Meanwhile, a Russian airplane maker says Syria is discussing the purchase of additional MiG-29 fighters.

A Russian arms industry source quoted by Interfax news agency says Moscow could hasten delivery of the S-300 to Syria, even though the missiles would still take months to arrive.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

'Atari Dump' Will Be Excavated, After Nearly 30 Years

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead.
Charlie Knoblock AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 1:59 pm

The New Mexico landfill or "Atari Dump" where the game console maker buried its mistakes — the biggest being the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — will be dug up by game developer Fuel Industries, which hopes to make a documentary about the project.

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Remembering Heroes Of The Second World War
12:26 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Army Nurse Mildred Manning: An 'Angel' POW With A Job To Do

Mildred Manning, then Mildred Dalton, was serving as a U.S. Army nurse in the Philippines when she was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in 1942.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

There were no "typical" tours of duty in World War II, but U.S. Army nurse Mildred Dalton Manning's was particularly extraordinary. Manning, along with six dozen other nurses, was held captive by the Japanese for almost three years. The group became known as the "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor."

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Report Of Liquid Woolly Mammoth Blood Prompts Clone Talk

A file photo from 2011 shows a man touching a giant bronze sculpture of a mammoth in the Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk. A team of Russian and South Korean scientists who found a well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth carcass this month say it also included blood.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Scientists in Siberia say they've extracted blood samples from the carcass of a 10,000-year-old woolly mammoth, reviving speculation that a clone of the extinct animal might someday walk the earth, if scientists are able to find living cells. But researchers say the find, which also included well-preserved muscle tissue, must be studied further to know its potential.

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Author Interviews
11:37 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Sex Overseas: 'What Soldiers Do' Complicates WWII History

Cover of What Soldiers Do

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

Americans often think of World War II as the "good war," but historian Mary Louise Roberts says her new book might make our understanding of that conflict "more truthful and more complex." The book, What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II France, tells the story of relations between American men and French women in Normandy and elsewhere.

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Economy
11:37 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Latest Economic Forecast: A Whole Lot Of 'Meh'

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We knew it couldn't last. We've been reporting some good news about the economy lately. The housing market has been doing quite well. Unemployment is high, but it's been falling. But today, the government released some key economic data and it suggests things are not quite as good as they seemed. Adam Davidson with NPR's Planet Money team joins us to explain. And, Adam, what did we learn today?

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Middle East
11:37 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Missile Shipment To Syria Complicates Kerry's Push For Peace

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. With the civil war raging in Syria, the U.S. and Russia are making another attempt to get on the same page about how to stop it. Diplomats meet in Geneva next week to try to salvage plans for a June peace conference. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, have run into problems ever since they announced that conference.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Turkish Police, Anti-Government Protesters Clash

Demonstrators flee from a water cannon during clashes with riot police Friday during a protest against the demolition of Taksim Gezi Park, in Taksim Square in Istanbul.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 1:03 pm

Turkish police in Istanbul used tear gas and water cannons to break up what are being described as the worst anti-government protests in years.

Reuters reports:

"Thousands of demonstrators massed on streets surrounding Istanbul's central Taksim Square, long a venue for political unrest, while protests erupted in the capital Ankara and the Aegean coastal city of Izmir."

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It's All Politics
10:50 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Romney Not Done With Politics

Former Massachusetts governor and 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., in March.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 11:10 am

Mitt Romney may have lost the biggest prize in American politics last year, but that doesn't mean he's left the game for good.

While there's no evidence to suggest he's interested in a third consecutive run for the White House, the man who topped the 2012 Republican national ticket is signaling his intent to play a role in the 2014 midterm election.

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Code Switch
10:20 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Desis Dominate The National Spelling Bee

Arvind Mahankali won the 2013 National Spelling Bee after spelling the word "knaidel."
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 11:48 am

When Arvind Mahankali won the Scripps-Howard National Spelling Bee last night, he became the sixth consecutive Indian-American winner and the 11th in the past 15 years.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Top Khmer Rouge Leaders Apologize For Regime's Atrocities

A Cambodian survivor of the infamous Tuol Sleng prison (known as S-21) poses by a picture of "Brother Number Two" Nuon Chea last year.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The top two surviving leaders of Cambodia's genocidal Khmer Rouge regime have expressed remorse for their actions while in power and acknowledged a degree of responsibility for the atrocities committed in their names.

Nuon Chea, the chief lieutenant of Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, who acted as head of state for the Maoist regime, are currently on trial for genocide and crimes against humanity.

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The Two-Way
9:17 am
Fri May 31, 2013

VIDEO: Patrick Stewart's Strong Words About Domestic Violence

Actor Patrick Stewart.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:33 am

This video is recommended viewing for everyone, but especially for anyone who has been a victim of domestic violence or knows someone who has.

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