Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, who was forced out of his job as part of a new bailout deal to keep Athens in the euro zone, tells the BBC that the austerity measures that come with the agreement are "going to fail."

The financial reforms, imposed in exchange for an 86 billion euro ($93.6 billion) lifeline will "go down in history as the greatest disaster of macroeconomic management ever," Varoufakis tells the BBC.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The U.S. Navy has confirmed that a fifth service member has died of wounds sustained in this week's shooting rampage at two military sites in Chattanooga.

According to a statement released by the Navy Office of Information:

"A male Navy Petty Officer succumbed to wounds received in the July 16 shooting at the Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) in Chattanooga, Tennessee July 18 at 2:17 a.m.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

In the deadliest single attack in a decade in Iraq, a truck bomb exploded at a crowded marketplace in eastern Diyala province, killing at least 115 people celebrating the end of the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan. The self-declared Islamic State reportedly has claimed responsibility.

What happens when you drop a regulation Spalding basketball from a 415-foot-high dam? It depends.

For a group from the trick basketball team How Ridiculous who sank a basket from atop the Gordon Dam in Tasmania, it meant landing a spot in the Guinness World Records book.

Pluto looks to be a far cry from the dead body that many scientists had long presumed. As the New Horizons probe continues to report back from the fringes of the solar system, a word that Mr. Spock might have used sums up the reaction: fascinating.

A year after a Malaysian airliner was shot down over eastern Ukraine by what is widely believed to have been a rebel-operated, Russian made surface-to-air missile, ceremonies were held to remember the 298 people killed in the disaster.

Meanwhile, the Kremlin has rebuffed calls for a United Nations tribunal to prosecute the suspects behind the July 17, 2014, downing of the Boeing 777 en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur.

The German parliament has approved the latest bailout for Greece, voting overwhelmingly for the 86 billion euro ($93.65 billion) package aimed at keeping Athens in the eurozone.

Ahead of the vote in the Bundestag, German Chancellor Angela Merkel warned lawmakers of "predictable chaos" if they failed to OK the deal. The final vote was 439 in favor, 119 opposed and 40 abstentions.

Novak Djokovic successfully defended his Wimbledon singles title against a concerted effort by Roger Federer, who was hoping for a record eighth Wimbledon title.

It is Djokovic's ninth Grand Slam title and third Wimbledon singles championship. He becomes only the eighth man to successfully defend that title.

Djokovic won the first set 7-6, and Federer leveled it in the second, 7-6. The third set was suspended for rain with a score of 3-2 for Djokovic. When play resumed, Djokovic closed out the set by winning it 6-4; he won the last set 6-3.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

The Associated Press reports that negotiators are prepared to announce a historic nuclear deal with Iran on Monday, but the U.S. State Department and some Iranian diplomats are tamping down speculation.

The AP says: "The envoys said a provisional agreement may be reached even earlier — by late Sunday. But they cautioned that final details of the pact were still being worked out and a formal agreement must still be reviewed by leaders in the capitals of Iran and the six world powers at the talks."

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

European creditors were still trying to forge a new deal with Athens to ward off a collapse of the Greek economy — the third bailout since 2010.

But European Union President Donald Tusk cancelled a meeting of 28 leaders, something NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson says is "a very rare occurrence which ... highlights how far the sides are still apart but also suggests there won't be a Grexit worked out, at least not today."

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

For the second time in 15 years, Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman has escaped from a maximum security prison — this time less than 18 months after his re-arrest and a pledge from authorities that he would not get out again.

Mexico's National Security Commission said in a statement that Guzman went to the showers shortly after 9 p.m. A later check of his cell found it empty.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

Eurozone finance ministers met Saturday to decide if they will bail Greece out for a third time since 2010, but the meetings wrapped up with no announced decision. The ministers remain skeptical that Athens would live up to the terms of any fresh agreement.

Talks are scheduled to resume Sunday.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

A purported affiliate of the self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a deadly car bomb attack that seriously damaged the Italian Consulate in Cairo, killing one Egyptian.

Roger Rees, the Tony Award-winning Welsh-born actor and director who got his start on the stage but also appeared in film and television shows such as Cheers and The West Wing, died Friday night in New York at age 71 after what his spokesman described as a "brief illness."

The Associated Press says Rees "had abruptly left The Visit on Broadway in late May to undergo a medical procedure."

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Serena Williams won her 21st Grand Slam title in a Wimbledon final against a much younger opponent, 21-year-old Garbine Muguruza of Spain.

For Williams, 33, it was her fourth Grand Slam championship in a row and her 25th career Grand Slam title match. It was Muguruza's first. Williams beat Muguruza 6-4, 6-4.

"Yeah, I'm having so much fun out here, you know, I just never dreamt I would be out here still and let alone winning," Williams told the crowd at Wimbledon after accepting her trophy.

Typhoon Chan-hom has come ashore just south of Shanghai, packing winds of up to 100 mph, forcing more than a million people to flee their homes and shutting down hundreds of flights at the region's airports.

Cham-hom is the second major storm to hit China this week, after Typhoon Linfa forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate in Guangdong province in the country's south.

China's official Xinhua news agency says no deaths or injuries from the storm have been reported so far.

At a ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the massacre of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica by Christian Serbs, the crowd turned its anger at the 1995 genocide against Serbia's prime minister, driving him from the event with rocks and bottles.

Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign tome, A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Miracle of America, has sold 11,854 copies. That should have been enough to earn it the No. 2 slot on The New York Times Best Seller List for hardcover nonfiction. But, instead comedian Aziz Ansari's Modern Romance occupies that spot.

Pope Francis normally receives all gifts with a polite thanks and smile. But the pontiff's reaction earlier this week when Bolivia's president gave him a crucifix in the shape of a communist hammer and sickle is open to interpretation.

Oil prices have further to fall before bottoming out amid a surge in production, mainly by OPEC nations, and a weakening of global demand, according to the International Energy Agency's latest forecast.

In the second quarter of 2015, the world's supply of oil was 96.39 million barrels a day, outstripping demand of 93.13 million barrels a day, according to the IEA's Oil Market Report, which described the world oil market as "massively oversupplied."

Volcanic ash spewing from Indonesia's Mount Raung has shut down airports and canceled flights on the resort island of Bali.

The volcano, located in East Java province, is about 95 miles west of Bali's international airport. The mountain began rumbling several weeks ago and on Friday began belching ash 12,000 feet into the air.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn says winds have blown the columns of smoke and ash southeast toward Bali and towns and villages near Mount Raung have been blanketed in ash since the volcano rumbled to life.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Army confirmed Thursday that it will cut 40,000 troops at several domestic bases over the next two years in a cost-saving move. If the White House and Congress are unable to avert another round of sequestration cuts, the troop reductions could be even deeper, according to Army officials.

The Obama administration's nominee to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff warns that Russia is the biggest threat to American interests and describes Moscow's recent geopolitical moves as "nothing short of alarming."

Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., speaking at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, said: "Russia presents the greatest threat to our national security. ... If you look at their behavior, it's nothing short of alarming."

The U.S. has condemned a move by Thailand to deport more than 100 ethnic Uighur Muslims back to China amid fears that the refugees will be persecuted by Beijing authorities.

Michael Sullivan, reporting for NPR from Thailand, says the Uighurs fled China more than a year ago and were detained while Thai authorities tried to figure out what to do with them. About 170 were sent to Turkey last month, and the remainder were handed over to Chinese authorities today.

IBM says it has overcome a technological hurdle by producing a prototype chip with transistors that are just 7 nanometers wide, or about 1/10,000th the width of a human hair. The smallest transistors currently in use are twice as big.

The breakthrough occurred at SUNY Polytechnic Institute's Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. It could result in the ability to place 20 billion transistors on a chip the size of a fingernail.

Update at 1:20 p.m. ET

Secretary of State John Kerry says the United States and its five negotiating partners working to hammer out a deal to curb Iran's nuclear program "will not rush and ... will not be rushed" into a deal.

He said that "despite all of the progress" made at the negotiating table, key issues remain unresolved.

"If in the end we are able to reach a deal, it has to be one that can stand the test of time," he said.

All Things Considered, NPR's flagship evening news program, is expanding its lineup of hosts: Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers will join veterans Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish on weekdays, and Michel Martin will become the new host of the weekend show.

The U.N. estimates that more than 4 million Syrians have fled the country since the start of the civil war there four years ago, making it the worst refugee crisis in a quarter century.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says the total number of refugees that have left Syria could be more than 4.25 million by the end of the year. An additional 7.6 million people are internally displaced.

Nguyen Phu Trong — the head of Vietnam's communist party and one of most powerful figures in the Southeast Asian nation — will meet with President Obama on Tuesday for a historic meeting aimed at strengthening ties between the two nations.

The 71-year-old party secretary said Friday that he hopes to build trust between Washington and Hanoi 20 years after President Bill Clinton normalized diplomatic ties and four decades after the end of the Vietnam War.

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