Stephan Bisaha

Stephan Bisaha is a former NPR Kroc Fellow. Along with producing Weekend Edition, Stephan has reported on national stories for Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as other NPR programs. He provided data analysis for an investigation into the Department of Veteran Affairs and reported on topics ranging from Emojis to mattresses.

Stephan has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and concentrated in data journalism. He currently covers education for KMUW and the Kansas News Service. 

Students in Kansas are bearing more than two-thirds of the cost of their education at public universities in the state.

That’s a sharp increase over the last 16 years. In 2001, revenue from tuition was little more than a third of the cost of education — about 35 percent. Today it's just over 71 percent.

Wink Hartman, who last week dropped from the Kansas governor’s race and backed Kris Kobach, said he’s offered his arena to the National Rifle Association for its upcoming national convention.

The offer looks to be more gesture than prospective deal. The Hartman Arena in Wichita suburb Park City holds 6,500, about two thirds the capacity of the venue where the NRA convention currently plans to meet in Dallas.

Kansas schools already have the freedom to arm their teachers. Gov. Jeff Colyer says now bonuses for teachers who pack weapons might be in order.

Yet the governor also said that local school districts should make the call, embracing those options that they think make the most sense to prevent school shootings.

One of the most common ways for high school students to earn college credit — and, by extension, reduce the cost of college — is to pass an AP exam.

But fewer Kansas students are graduating with a passing grade on an Advanced Placement exam compared to their peers in other states.

Alayna Nelson, a sophomore at Wichita Northwest High School, grew up hearing stories of repeated mass shootings on the news.

“Every single time this happened I always wanted to do something about it,” Nelson said.

Now, Nelson and other students in her generation are taking action against gun violence.

"I feel like I’m finally getting to the age where people will start listening to me,” she said. 

No restricting free speech, no matter the perspective. A bill backed by Republican lawmakers intends to send that message to college campuses in Kansas.

The Campus Free Speech Protection Act would insist that universities make clear that all of their outdoor spaces, not just “free speech zones,” embrace political outlooks and events regardless of how they fit with trends in academic thought.

Kansas could struggle to stop college students from taking their money to other Midwestern states if it continues to charge higher tuition.

Kansas could struggle to stop college students from taking their money to other Midwestern states if it continues to charge higher tuition.

A pay gap that left Kansas professors trailing their peers for more than a decade grew wider last year.

A new report from the Kansas Board of Regents confirmed that the state pays its academics less than the public colleges and universities they compete against.

The number of college degrees and certificates earned at Kansas' public universities last year fell short of the Board of Regents' target for the second year in a row.

Today, about three of every 20 students in Kansas fail to graduate from high school. Gov. Sam Brownback contends that in five years only one will fall short.

The Kansas State Board of Education on Tuesday approved two new pilot programs for educating teachers to address Kansas’ teacher shortage.

Students at most state universities in Kansas will pay more to live on-campus than if they were to rent an off-campus apartment, according to an analysis by KMUW.

The analysis is based on new room and board rates unanimously approved recently by the Kansas Board of Regents. Pittsburg State University received the smallest increase — less than 1 percent for a dorm room shared by two students — while Wichita State University saw the largest increase at just less than 3 percent.


Kansas colleges and universities could be facing steep state funding cuts in 2018.

A legislative committee discussing possibilities for balancing the state budget put the Regents on notice Wednesday, asking how an 18 percent cut would affect higher education.

“This system will look very different from the one we’ve enjoyed for a long time," answered Board of Regents President Blake Flanders.

Flanders says a cut that big would be a shock to the system.

“If we’re asked about cuts at about this level of cuts we always take it seriously," Flanders says.

The representative for community colleges in Kansas is warning the state Board of Regents that a federal tax overhaul could make higher education less affordable.