High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

THIS SATURDAY NIGHT!!! 

Don't miss this HPPR Living Room Concert from traveling Southwest singer-songwriters, BITTERSWEET HIGHWAY. This is their first show for our audience, so let's show them some love!

High Plains Morning was honored to speak with Denise Cross (Treasurer/Financial Advisor & Volunteer) and Stefanie Rodarte-Suto (Volunteer & Presenter) at ONE-Amarillo, an area nonprofit committed to stop human trafficking in the greater Amarillo area by educating, empowering, and engaging with those at risk, survivors, and compassionate volunteers in our community that are willing to help.

Thank you to Bruce Moseley, Executive Director of the Turn Center (and semi-finalist for best beard in Amarillo), for stopping by High Plains Morning to share some information about their organization’s upcoming sporting events with Kids Inc. (or, Kids Inclusion). Together, they’ll provide adaptive sports opportunities for all children in the Amarillo area. “We are excited that children with disabilities and without disabilities will get to play sports together!,” Moseley says.

For someone with five horses, two dogs, three cats, a donkey, a rabbit, and a husband, Chera Hammons sure gets a lot of work done. She stopped by High Plains Morning, with Dr. Eric Meljac of the High Plains Poetry Project, to promote an upcoming reading with an impromptu literary throw down (ahem, a reading).

Thanks so much to Amy Berry, Tour Leader for the African Children’s Choir, for speaking with High Plains Morning about the upcoming show in Amarillo. This group has been at it since 1984, aiding kids in Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, and South Africa. Their purpose is to help create new leadership for tomorrow's Africa, with a focus on education for all. The kids have performed for presidents, heads of state, and Queen Elizabeth II for her diamond jubilee; they’ve also played with Paul McCartney, Annie Lennox, Mariah Carey, and more.

As someone who is ALSO “Too Old to Die Young,” I want to personally thank Dege Legg, a.k.a. Brother Dege, for taking some time to chat with High Plains Morning before his show in Amarillo.

You might recognize his music from Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained, and he’s also been featured on the Discovery Channel and National Geographic. He was fresh off his nine-week European tour, so we’re grateful he carved out some time to share his insights with our listeners.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I thought I'd plant a seed of history about a favorite feat of flair from a former First Lady. I'm talking about the Highway Beautification Act, passed in 1965, which was a visionary project of Lady Bird Johnson. 

Bob is back, folks! This High Plains singer-songwriter has never been a traditional Texas country musician living the honky-tonk life, even though he's spent more than his share of time on the roadhouse circuit with some of the most colorful music legends in Texas. Bob Livingston's new album, Up the Flatland Stairs, has him traveling across the US -- and HPPR Living Room Concerts is pleased to announce he'll be playing for fans on the High Plains!

The 2018 Fall Read's theme is Let’s Talk – Aging, Death & Dying.  You'll find thoughts and ideas about books from Radio Readers through a series of BookBytes posted below. If you'd like to contribute a BookByte, simply contact Kathleen Holt for more information. 

The Amarillo Little Theatre Academy and AAA Electric are proud to present Into the Woods as ALT Academy's first Summer musical. To celebrate their 25th season, this “stripped down version” of the storybook musical is based on several Brothers Grimm fairy tales and has been mounted with boundless imagination in a witty and wild theatrical reinvention of a beloved modern classic.

On today's Growing on the High Plains, we'll share a burst of color for your post-Fourth of July blues. I'll spend some time on an elegant flower I've enjoyed for years in my own garden, and it's also a big hit with the pollenators.

I'm talking about bee balm, which is indeed medicinal! Native Americans dried the tender leaves to brew herbal tea, and that practice also influenced early settlers who were dependent on black tea from England—and they found  it to be quite revolutionary (literally)!

Press Release/Wes Reeves

A group of music lovers announced plans this week to build a privately funded plaza and amphitheater in downtown Amarillo.

The plaza will be named for beloved Amarillo singer-songwriter AJ Swope, who was tragically killed in a car accident five years ago. The group is hoping to secure land near the new multi-purpose event venue now under construction on Buchanan Street.

To quote The Boss, "You can't start a fire without a spark." So High Plains Public Radio wants to thank model humans Lindsey Verrill and Jeff Johnston for burning their end-of-tour flame on the Texas Panhandle.

Thanks to Kegan Hollis and Matthew Williams from Mariposa Eco-Village for stopping by High Plains Morning to talk about Fourth Fest. If you're looking for some art and music in the Panhandle, stop by the event from 6pm-2am at Mariposa Eco-Village (1501 N. Soncy).

How might have Native Americans and early settlers washed up after a day in the Dust Bowl, in an age before shower gels and laundry detergent pods? The answer probably won’t surprise you, as the aptly-named native tree is the subject of today’s Growing on the High Plains.

This week, High Plains Morning spoke with the delightful Mollea Wainscott, Special Projects Coordinator for Housing at the Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation. We were inspired by her passion for revitalizing abandoned, "blight" housing, making it functional and available for low-income families.

High Plains Morning was honored to host Tejay Adams, the founder of the Amarillo-based nonprofit Stand Against Suicide. He's hosting a rally this Sunday, June 24th, at 34th & Georgia in Amarillo from 2:00 to 4:01pm, to bring visibility to the public health crisis of suicide in our region. You can  RSVP here.

From grapefruit to Cadillacs, everything looks prettier in pink! And flower gardens are no exception. So what’s the preferred puce-petaled posy for High Plains planters?

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re delving into the “pinks,” the quintessential cottage flower also known as Dianthus. From their humble origins in English gardens to the palette of 300+ species that exist today, the prolific Pinks have been providing a playful pop to garden perimeters for centuries.

Little Mazarn told us they were coming thorough Amarillo, and we had to make sure they'd pause and play us a few tunes. This Austin-based multi-instrumentalist Lindsey Verrill, accompanied by virtuosic sonic wails from Jeff Johnston on saw, blew our minds at South by Southwest 2018.

Longtime listeners already know how High Plains Morning loves lookin' out for our own, so when we heard Oklahoma's own Turnpike Troubadours were slidin' through the Panhandle, we got one of them on the horn.

Last week we set the roots of our two-part tale of the mighty onion, peeling back the odorous history, health benefits, and cultural significance across the globe. On today’s installment of Growing on the High Plains, let’s bring it back home—to our own back yards! We’ll discuss the many layers of growing and harvesting from your onion patch.

There's nothing quite as distinctive as the familiar spice and tang of a cut onion. Whether you've pulled them wild from the yard or someone's slicing a shallot, leek or chive for an aromatic meal. 

Today on Growing on the High Plains, we'll take a bite out of the many layers of biology and history that make up the common onion. You'll laugh. You'll cry. And you'll do it all again next week in part two! 

 

My grandmother called them "flags," but they're also known as "poor man's orchids." Anyone aware of common flowers that take to our climate will surely recognize -- and likely know a little about --these blooms.

On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll tell you all about the iris, a flower that's heady, hardy, and just right for thriving on the High Plains. 

Blink and you’ll miss the brief, springtime bloom of these purple-hued beauties. But not to worry—they’ll be back again this time next year…and the next…and the next. Because believe it or not, these sweet-smelling shrubs can have a lifespan of more than 300 years.

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about lilacs. Revered worldwide for their intoxicating fragrance and graceful cascading flowers, it’s actually their resilience to travel and transplantation that placed them on American shores early in our history.

Phillpsburg, New Jersey native Pentley Holmes stopped by High Plains Morning at HPPR Studios—Amarillo to play a live, in-studio set before his Amarillo debut, May 15th at 7pm at FireSongs at Fire Slice Pizzaria.

A huge thank you to Amarillo College's Suzuki Guitar Ensemble for cramming into the HPPR Studio in Amarillo for an impressive show of skill and talent. 

Instructor Homero Campos's Beginning Guitar Ensemble includes: David Schneider (9); Lucy Schneider (9); Will Albracht (8); Bennett Amos (8); Jonathan Smith (8); and Andrew Davis (9). 

Are you in the market for a little feline companionship? Perhaps some silver, furry buds to bring joy to your life? But maybe a friend that won’t sharpen its claws on the edges of your furniture or sit on your head at 4:00 a.m. begging for food?

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about another early-spring bloomer: the pussy willow! Though it’s fluffy catkins won’t purr, they’ll bring just as much feckless enjoyment to your home, inside and out.

Today on High Plains Morning, we heard from Sonja Gross, Public Information Officer for the Amarillo District of the Texas Department of Transportation. She came on the show to remind us about the very real dangers of distracted driving.

That's any activity that takes your attention away from driving, such as texting and talking on a mobile phone to eating and drinking, putting on makeup, shaving, reading, programming a navigation system, watching a video and even adjusting the radio. 

Punko de Mayo is TOMORROW, folks! Punk and Disorderly, High Plains Public Radio's latest regional music program, comes to you for one-hour every Saturday night (well, Sunday morning) and is dedicated to all things punk rock.

Plus, Bryan joins Steve Johnson on Open Range on Saturday at 2p CT. 

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