High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

As our short days of winter flutter by, many High Plains gardeners (like myself) have our minds on the forthcoming growing season. Today's Growing on the High Plains comes as a response to one of these foliage-focused friends that asked me about planting for pollinators—namely, monarch butterflies. They do have plants of preference, and I'll share some tips for those interested in showing these "flying flowers" some hospitality. 

High Plains, meet Korby Lenker.

If you listen to High Plains Morning, you've probably heard his music. If you follow what's new in US folk/Americana, you definitely know him. But if not, HPPR is happy to introduce y'all at our first 2018 Living Room Concerts! 

Live in Concert: TWO SHOWS! 

No, we're not in Kentucky...and I don't think you saw me standin' around. Nonetheless, we have a pretty "loony" topic this week.

Last week I offered some history of The Old Farmer's Almanac, and this year's edition foretells a pair of rarities for us High Plains dwellers: blue moons, twice in the first few months of 2018.

Today's Growing on the High Plains offers the backstory on lunar "blueness" and what we might expect in our forthcoming growing season as a result.

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains explores the longest-running, continuously-published periodical on our continent. While I remember the petite, butter-yellow booklet regularly crossing the counter at my father's pharmacy, I wanted to share some of the fascinating history of this annual reference volume and what it has meant to those who have historically made a living off the land.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll share my experiences with the many living Christmas trees we've had through the years. While they require a little extra care and attention (and demand a much shorter indoor stay), live trees make for a cozy, rustic Christmas display.

Our family has welcomed a variety of trees into our holiday home—and want to know the best part? Unlike cut trees, these fragrant fellows stick around all year long, reminding us of the love and joy shared during the season it sparkled in the spotlight.

We've all heard of a ribbon-cutting ceremony to dedicate a new building, but have you ever seen a crew of construction workers hoisting what looks like a Christmas tree to the highest beam of a completed structure? Well, I assure you: it's a thing! Commonly referred to as "topping out," this age-old ceremony has a fascinating history that spans the globe.

Whenever I get the chance to travel beyond the edge of the High Plains, I try to visit the public radio stations serving the town to which I'm a'going. Recently, I had the chance to stop by two different stations: WFMT Radio Network on the north side of Chicago, Illinois and KCUR/Harvest Public Media in Kansas City, Missouri.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I invite you to join me as we take a visit to the Wagon Wheel Cafe & Bakery in Ulysses, Kansas to celebrate one of the best things about being alive: PIE!

Tune in today to find out how these dedicated bakers keep the crusts and fillings flowing throughout the year, and especially during the holidays—and see if your favorite pie is one of their best sellers.

The holidays are coming, and some of us are scrambling to make our seasonal gift lists. If you happen to have a gardening enthusiast in your life, there's a great book available that you might consider: The Earth Knows My Name by Patricia Klindienst.

To compile the stories in this book, the author traveled across the US, digging deep into different cultures to unearth how they engage with the food they grow. From Native Americans to immigrants from Asia and Europe, you'll learn fascinating tales of bountiful gardens in both rural and urban regions. 

On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'm serving up some Thanksgiving reflections on this year's gardening season. There has been so much for which we are thankful, including the bounty of High Plains rain since Spring.

Each week, Valerie Brown-Kuchera will bring us Little Spouse on the Prairie, the show where she pokes affectionate fun at her husband, her kids, her home and her rural life, even though she loves them all fiercely.

Tia McGraff & Tommy Parham—TWO SHOWS!

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FIRST SHOW: Thursday, November 30
Satanta Senior Center (118 Sequoyah St.) -- Show @ 7p

RSVP for Satanta online here, or call 806.367.9088 to be added to the list!

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SECOND SHOW: Friday, December 1

Thanks so much to a trio of Nashville darlings, Szlachetka & Granville Automatic, for stopping by High Plains Morning today!

Find out more about their music and forthcoming albums by clicking on their names.

And if you're in the Amarillo area, go see them at Bar Z Winery tonight (11/16/17) in Canyon, TX.  If you missed their interview and live, in-studio performance, click the link below.   

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll dig back through my memories of the Osage orange tree—a scruffy-but-useful native of our region.

You might know them as the bushy bearer of hedge apples—those puckered, chartreuse orbs that usually just clonk to the ground and rot. Well, I grew up knowing them by a very different name, and our family employed them as pest control, believe it or not. But ask a rancher or farmer trying to secure their property border, and they'll tell you that these trees are good for a lot more!

The time is ripe for a flash of red and gold over a white rump, flickering through the sky and trees,  as well as digging dinner from the ground. (All you High Plains ornithophiles will know what I’m talking about!)

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll discuss Northern flickers (Colaptes auratus)—the medium-to-large, brownish woodpeckers that tend to appear when the colder seasons are near. Spotting their showy, dotted plumage always pairs well with our vibrant, changing leaves in the fall. 

For part two of our winter squash series, we'll get into the guts of a tender, lovely little fellow you might find much easier to handle and prepare for your harvest table. 

High Plains, meet the delicata! Its skin is edible, and the food scientists have perfected the bush variety so it resists the issues many other varieties face.  

We hope you enjoy today's Growing on the High Plains and are inspired to grow delicata squash in YOUR fall garden.

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

The Gibbonses - Live in Concert!

Friday, November 10

The Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP online here or call 806.367.9088 so we can add you to the list!

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Thanks so much to the cast of The Rocky Horror Show from RnR Entertainment for stopping by the High Plains Morning studio today! We had a blast hearing about the production, and thanks for giving us a live, in-studio performance. 

For more information about the show and the troupe, read this great article from Chip Chandler at Panhandle PBS. 

Today's Growing on the High Plains digs DEEP into the hearty meat of the winter squash.

While many are taken aback by their thick skin, heft, and cloistered cluster of slermy seeds, these gourds are sweet, succulent siblings that enrich every seasonal table. So don't be afraid to chop hard and enjoy these winter treasures. 

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

The War & Treaty - Live in Concert!

Saturday, October 28 

Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave., Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP NOW online, or call 806.367.9088 so we can add you to the list!

As the days get shorter, you might notice our High Plains foliage taking a long, slow bath in the glow of the October sunset.

That's right: our awesome Autumn is upon us, so today's edition of Growing on the High Plains will take an inventory of what makes a cornucopia of garden color. Will the recent, regular rainfall reign in the reds? Can potatoes predict a wet winter? And what will the wooly worms have to say about it? Whatever shade the shrubbery may fade, we must all revel in the "big reveal" or the coming color show.   

·        High Plains Public Radio sponsors live music concerts across the High Plains. Most shows are scheduled for venues in the Amarillo, TX area or at HPPR’s studio in Garden City, KS—but we are always looking for hosts in towns across our listening region. We primarily book shows for Friday or Saturday nights, as those nights draw a bigger crowd.

Tonight in Amarillo, don't miss The RandyBoys, live at Fireslice Pizzaria (34th & Coulter) as they KICK OFF their 2017 HPPR Music Ambassador Tour of our listening region. For full details, locations, and dates, visit their website! But just so it's easy, there's a visual rundown below.

THINGS TO KNOW: 

-No RSVPs are necessary. Seating is first-come-first-seated. 

The Gary L. Nall Lecture Series in Western Studies presents Brian DeLay: “The Texas Gun Frontier & the Travails of Mexican History.” 

Don't miss my interview with co-founder and drummer for Kansas, Phil Ehart. We talk about touring, keeping a the music fresh after 40+ years, and he attempts to answer a question I've had for years: "What the heck IS 'prog rock?'" [Spoiler alert: He's not quite sure.]

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

Renfree Isaacs - Live in Concert!

Saturday, October 21st

The Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP ONLINE NOW! or call 806.367.9088.

***This show is sponsored by Evocation Coffee & Chamber Music Amarillo.****

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to announce the The RandyBoys—Music Ambassador Tour 2017. They'll be bringing HPPR's Living Room Concerts to 18 communities across the High Plains, including the Texas & Oklahoma Panhandles, Western Kansas, and Eastern Colorado. From October 17 thru Nov 9th, Randy and Randy will be cruising across our listening area. Click here to find out if they're coming to YOUR town! 

On September 22nd, High Plains Public Radio headed over to Albuquerque, NM for one of the most inspirational music festivals in the US: ¡Globalquerque! This world music collective brings together global artists in a way no other festival does, with inspirational, soul-lifting performances. It takes place each year at the National Hispanic Cultural Center—an incredible space for a truly unique festival. Performances take place across three stages: the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theater, & dance outside on the Plaza Mayor. You can learn more about the Global Fiesta free Saturday daytime programming and the Global Village of Crafts, Culture and Cuisine.

Today's edition of Growing on the High Plains asks you to hearken to our High Plains history as we ponder the lot of early pioneers, especially what harvest time meant to them. 

Autumn is here, so let's celebrate with hot coffee, cookies, and LIVE FOLK MUSIC from Chicago singer-songwriter HEATHER STYKA! 

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HEATHER STYKA - Live in Amarillo

Saturday, Oct. 14

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP today! This will be a GREAT SHOW!

 

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