High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR.  A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add news from NPR and regional weather reports at the top of each hour, and you have a great way to move your day along. 

Scroll down to view program playlists.

This week's edition of Growing on the High Plains features a regional bird of paradise that's both easy to maintain and brilliant when in bloom: the bromeliad. With minor maintenance, this sturdy plant will continue to grow, gracing your garden with its glory. So it's a lot like public radio! Please help HPPR continue to "pretty up" your days on the High Plains. Donate today during our Fall Membership Drive.  

Don't miss a phenomenal DOUBLE CONCERT for guitar lovers across the High Plains! Two GUITAR MASTERS perform at HPPR Studios in Garden City, KS on Friday, November 4th at 7pm. 

Hiroya Tsukamoto and

Adam Gardino, with special guest Kelly Champlin.

Click here to RSVP online or call 806.367.9088.

Today's edition of Growing on the High Plains asks you to hearken to our High Plains history as we ponder the lot of early pioneers, especially what harvest time meant to them. 

Like our forefathers who settled this land, so must we all pitch in to ensure a bounty when it's needed. (Just ask the Little Red Hen!) Today, we ask YOU to take a moment and consider what it is that you reap from HPPR's programming.

Called “the best kind of singer-songwriter” by the Dallas Observer, Vanessa Peters has played more than 1,100 shows in 11 countries and has independently released ten critically acclaimed albums. She tours the US and much of Europe, where she has a strong fan base thanks to the albums she made with her former Italian band, Ice Cream on Mondays. (It's because in Italy, all the gelaterias are closed on Monday -- and Vanessa struggled. Oh, she struggled.) 

FASO is thrilled to present internationally celebrated concert violinist, Rachel Barton Pine for the 2nd concert in the Friends of Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1024 (FASO)'s 2016-2017 Concert Season on Sunday, October 16!

Concerts are held at Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church, (1601 Georgia St., Amarillo, TX). 

This week's installment of Growing on the High Plains provides an inside scoop on how best to beckon bashful butterflies to your High Plains garden. 

  From deadheading your branching mums to seizing (rather than sneezing) rods of gold, these well-worn pointers will ensure an influx of "flying flowers" to your all-you-can-eat growing space.  Learn what to plant and how to prune so that you'll optimize unannounced visits from thirsty nectar collectors.   

Canyon Area Library  brought in some High Plains wanna-be podcasters and WOW -- we were all amazed by what these gifted storytellers pulled together in less than an hour!

Thank you so much to our participants, our organizers, and all the parents. (Your kids are GREAT!) The spontaneous creativity knocked our socks off. From the studio to the airwaves, see below for the final cuts.

High Plains Morning was recently haunted by the living ghost of Gabrielle Louise, who was traveling through Amarillo while touring for her recent full-length album release, If the Static Clears.

HPPR went to ¡GLOBALQUERQUE!, a world music festival in Abluquerque, New Mexico on 9/23 - 9/25. Given the eerie welcome from our drive into town, I had a feeling it would be spectacular -- and it was.

Here's a rundown of some of the incredible artists featured this year, including exclusive photos and videos of the performances. For the full festival line-up, please see the festival's website

Ripe, fragrant fruit from the orchard is the apple of any gardener's eye.

Too bad this year's crop of apples had an abundance of beady, little eyes of their own. 

This week's installment of Growing on the High Plains gets to the core of how to avoid "coddling" common uninvited guests that often make cozy homes in our summer fruit trees.

Today on High Plains Morning, we were thrilled to host SHEL, a Fort Collins, CO AND Nashville-based troupe of four sisters who have been writing and performing together since they were kids.

Currently on tour with their 2nd LP, Just Crazy Enough, SHEL wanted to high-five the High Plains -- so they stopped in to play us a few tunes!

As promised, here's the link to their delightful new video, "You Could Be My Baby."

"The fairies break their dances and leave the printed lawn." —A.E. Housman

This week on Growing on the High Plains, I have an offbeat tale about odd circles that seem to crop up supernaturally on the grass. Rest assured: there's a logical reason for the peculiar presence of these "fairy rings," especially given this summer's peculiarities.  Whether they're marked by darkness or puffs of white, learn more about this serpentine fungus among us.  

They pray. They prey.

But pray/prey tell: why is it that gardeners have been seeing more of these elegant insects this year? Whatever the reason, they're a welcome sight -- not only for their alien-esque arabesques, but also because they feast on pests like something out of a horror film.

Hear more about mantids on this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains.

And it's a good one! (Don't forget your popcorn.) 

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series

Presents High Plains folk music icon,


HPPR Studios (210 N. 7th St.)

Garden City, KS

Doors @ 6:30p | Show @ 7p

Suggested Donation: $15

What I Did on My Summer Vacation

By Skip Mancini

It's back to school for kids across the High Plains, so I'd like to submit this audio essay about my summer travels.

As we revel in the centennial of the U.S. National Park Service, what better time to check out what Ken Burns's documentary calls "America's Best Idea?" Today's episode of Growing on the High Plains highlights our extraordinary trip to  Yellowstone National Park. 

Gardeners, when was the last time you had a young one at your side while you played in the dirt? Consider turning your next venture outdoors into a little life lesson for a child unfamiliar with our methods. When you plant a seed in the mind of a child, you never know what will grow.

Today we'll consider the many important lessons that can be learned from a visit to the garden. By encouraging a child's natural curiosity about plants, dirt, and how things grow, you teach them valuable knowledge about their world -- and where exactly they fit within it.

Crystal Yates - Live in Amarillo 

Friday, Sept. 9th @ The Chalice Abbey

(2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia & Wolflin) 

$15 Sugg. Donation

Art reception @ 6p  |  Music @ 8:30p

RSVP online or by calling 806.367.9088!

"Powerful." "Magical." "Inspiring." 

Children seem to experience a singular wonder when you put them in a garden -- something beyond the splendor of the grass, the blush of a plump pear, and the inviting smells and creatures. They also tend to tune in to what that garden says about its curator.

Today we'll take a walk through my garden, but please enter with a child's honest curiosity. As you survey the bean vines flanked with flowers, perhaps you'll see an unlikely shelter. I know I did. 

Don't let chaos reign in your flower garden!

 Join me as we embark on PART TWO of our segment discussing those beautiful-and-beastly blooms: perennials. On today's show, you'll learn to parse out the "spreaders" from the "clumpers." 

Plus, just a few tips on digging up the mother plant, handling the root ball, and singling out which species might be invasive.   


I just received this incredible thank-you card from Sarai, my new buddy at the Canyon Public Library. She came in to drop off her registration for our Chase the Sunset event in the Palo Duro Canyon, and I got her to record a station ID for High Plains Morning. Thank you, Sarai! You'll never understand how VERY happy this makes a morning DJ!


Gardeners have a saying about perennials: "The first year they sleep; the second year they creep; and the third year they leap."

Today on Growing on the High Plains, we'll unearth a few common myths about these boisterous blooms, which are quite misunderstood by beginning gardeners. If you go into the ground with a deeper understanding of what to expect from perennials, you'll sooner reap the sweet smell of success.

Band of Lovers is back! 

When music writer Kate Bee wrote about their debut album, “It’s a golden road trip,” her words also reflect the band’s lifestyle. Born on the road in the fall of 2013, Band of Lovers has been living and touring full-time in their self-converted 1997 Dodge van.

Some days it's so hot you have to shake your fists at the sky and ask, "Are you Sirius?" And the dog star would blink down at you and answer, "I sure am."

In this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains, Skip takes us through the origins of the phrase "Dog Days of Summer," which has more to do with  ancients musing about the night sky than it does panting pups on the prairie. 

Let's talk about native plants, and what they can add to YOUR High Plains garden. Not only do these natural neighbors have what it takes to survive in our unpredictable climates, they also make a seamless habitat for indigenous birds and bugs -- many of whom are crucial to the health of our landscape. 


***But if you would like to volunteer, donate, or help out with this event in any way, contact Jenny ASAP at jinzerillo@hppr.org. We're going to have a blast!


On Saturday, August 13th, High Plains Public Radio & the Amarillo Art Institute invite kids of the High Plains to CHASE THE SUNSET with a celebration of art, music, and nature to bid the summer a final farewell.

Rebecca Loebe
Live in Amarillo on Saturday, July 30th
The Chalice Abbey
(2717 Stanley – Off Georgia by Wolflin Square)
Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP online or by calling 806.367.9088. 




HPPR is proud to announce our Summer/Fall lineup for the Living Room Concert Series, with shows in Amarillo, TX & Garden City, KS. 

The Vogts Sisters

Saturday, July 2
LIVE  in Garden City, KS

HPPR Studios ~ 210 N. 7th Street
Doors @ 6:30 pm | Show @ 7:00 pm

Please RSVP online, or call us at 806.367.9088!
Suggested Donation: $15