High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

This week, High Plains Morning spoke with the delightful Mollea Wainscott, Special Projects Coordinator for Housing at the Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation. We were inspired by her passion for revitalizing abandoned, "blight" housing, making it functional and available for low-income families.

High Plains Morning was honored to host Tejay Adams, the founder of the Amarillo-based nonprofit Stand Against Suicide. He's hosting a rally this Sunday, June 24th, at 34th & Georgia in Amarillo from 2:00 to 4:01pm, to bring visibility to the public health crisis of suicide in our region. You can  RSVP here.

From grapefruit to Cadillacs, everything looks prettier in pink! And flower gardens are no exception. So what’s the preferred puce-petaled posy for High Plains planters?

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re delving into the “pinks,” the quintessential cottage flower also known as Dianthus. From their humble origins in English gardens to the palette of 300+ species that exist today, the prolific Pinks have been providing a playful pop to garden perimeters for centuries.

Little Mazarn told us they were coming thorough Amarillo, and we had to make sure they'd pause and play us a few tunes. This Austin-based multi-instrumentalist Lindsey Verrill, accompanied by virtuosic sonic wails from Jeff Johnston on saw, blew our minds at South by Southwest 2018.

Longtime listeners already know how High Plains Morning loves lookin' out for our own, so when we heard Oklahoma's own Turnpike Troubadours were slidin' through the Panhandle, we got one of them on the horn.

Last week we set the roots of our two-part tale of the mighty onion, peeling back the odorous history, health benefits, and cultural significance across the globe. On today’s installment of Growing on the High Plains, let’s bring it back home—to our own back yards! We’ll discuss the many layers of growing and harvesting from your onion patch.

There's nothing quite as distinctive as the familiar spice and tang of a cut onion. Whether you've pulled them wild from the yard or someone's slicing a shallot, leek or chive for an aromatic meal. 

Today on Growing on the High Plains, we'll take a bite out of the many layers of biology and history that make up the common onion. You'll laugh. You'll cry. And you'll do it all again next week in part two! 

 

My grandmother called them "flags," but they're also known as "poor man's orchids." Anyone aware of common flowers that take to our climate will surely recognize -- and likely know a little about --these blooms.

On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll tell you all about the iris, a flower that's heady, hardy, and just right for thriving on the High Plains. 

Blink and you’ll miss the brief, springtime bloom of these purple-hued beauties. But not to worry—they’ll be back again this time next year…and the next…and the next. Because believe it or not, these sweet-smelling shrubs can have a lifespan of more than 300 years.

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about lilacs. Revered worldwide for their intoxicating fragrance and graceful cascading flowers, it’s actually their resilience to travel and transplantation that placed them on American shores early in our history.

Phillpsburg, New Jersey native Pentley Holmes stopped by High Plains Morning at HPPR Studios—Amarillo to play a live, in-studio set before his Amarillo debut, May 15th at 7pm at FireSongs at Fire Slice Pizzaria.

A huge thank you to Amarillo College's Suzuki Guitar Ensemble for cramming into the HPPR Studio in Amarillo for an impressive show of skill and talent. 

Instructor Homero Campos's Beginning Guitar Ensemble includes: David Schneider (9); Lucy Schneider (9); Will Albracht (8); Bennett Amos (8); Jonathan Smith (8); and Andrew Davis (9). 

Are you in the market for a little feline companionship? Perhaps some silver, furry buds to bring joy to your life? But maybe a friend that won’t sharpen its claws on the edges of your furniture or sit on your head at 4:00 a.m. begging for food?

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about another early-spring bloomer: the pussy willow! Though it’s fluffy catkins won’t purr, they’ll bring just as much feckless enjoyment to your home, inside and out.

Today on High Plains Morning, we heard from Sonja Gross, Public Information Officer for the Amarillo District of the Texas Department of Transportation. She came on the show to remind us about the very real dangers of distracted driving.

That's any activity that takes your attention away from driving, such as texting and talking on a mobile phone to eating and drinking, putting on makeup, shaving, reading, programming a navigation system, watching a video and even adjusting the radio. 

Punko de Mayo is TOMORROW, folks! Punk and Disorderly, High Plains Public Radio's latest regional music program, comes to you for one-hour every Saturday night (well, Sunday morning) and is dedicated to all things punk rock.

Plus, Bryan joins Steve Johnson on Open Range on Saturday at 2p CT. 

What vegetable is versatile enough to bring a zesty, big crunch to burgers at a backyard barbecue, but delicate enough to add a refreshing refinement to finger sandwiches at a garden party?

That’s right! Today’s Growing on the High Plains is all about the cucumber. Whether relishing them on hot dogs, thick-sliced on a salad, or elevating a normal glass of water to something spa-worthy, cool hands have been on cukes for more than 3,000 years.

Book lovers, mark your calendars! On Sunday, May 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. CST, HPPR Radio Readers invites you to a live, on-air, book discussion for the 2018 Spring Read: "WWI-Perspectives."

Don’t miss a spirited discussion of our four books with panelists from Panhandle-Plains Historical MuseumBethel College, & High Plains Public Radio + educators from across our region! The panelists will explore themes raised in the discussion of the book through contributed Radio Reader BookBytes. Plus, it will stream live on HPPR's Facebook page!

There’s a particular square-stemmed annual with fragrant leaves and tubular purple blooms that often polarizes High Plains gardeners. Some say it’s a nuisance. Some consider it a colorful harbinger of spring after a long, drab winter.

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about the divisive henbit, a member of the mint family that establishes itself in the fall, matures to thick foliage, and then blossoms in the spring but generally disappears with the first hot spell of summer.

High Plains Morning wants to thank Sarah McQuaid for the phone interview about her video for "Slow Decay," which was inspired by the true story of Bill Conner—a father who biked 1,400 miles across the US to raise awareness about organ donation. 

High Plains Morning thanks Lisa Hancock from the  Area Agency on Aging of the Panhandle  for stopping into the studio today to share information about their 2018 Older Americans Month Celebration: Engage at Every Age.

Here are the details!

WHEN:            

May 4, 2018

9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m

***Registration check in opens at 8:30 a.m.***

 --FREE EVENT!

“Like Lucinda Williams in a Carhartt jacket, Christy Hays works rugged metaphors into emotionally charged country folk.” —Austin Chronicle

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Don't miss our latest Texas-based singer-songwriter featured as part of the HPPR Living Room Concert Series: Christy Hays!She's a gifted singer-songwriter from Illinois, based in Austin, TX, but regularly pulled into Montana and the Pacific Northwest. Her voice and songwriting will be a real treat for HPPR listeners.

 

Christy Hays - LIVE IN CONCERT

Yes, we have no apricots (again)! In theory, apricot trees should thrive in our High Plains climate. They are hardy enough to survive the cold winters, and our dry summers actually aid in the maturation of their soft, sweet summer bounty. So why do our region’s apricot trees only yield fruit every 5 to 10 years?

EXCITING NEWS! This Tuesday night in Amarillo, HPPR's listening area has Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit, with folk icon Richard Thompson, LIVE IN CONCERT! And right now on High Plains Morning, you can get TWO FREE TICKETS!

Get in on Skip Mancini's Spring Garden Basket. Pledge your support TODAY from 9a-12p CT, during High Plains Morning, for your chance to win. PLUS, your dollars will be doubled thanks to Mary Emeny of Amarillo, TX! 

SUPPORT PUBLIC RADIO TODAY! Call 1.800.678.7444 or pledge online.

We all know that nothing compares to sun-ripened strawberries, home-grown in your own backyard. Well, spring has sprung, so it’s ripe time to begin planning your future crop.

Lynn Phipps has finally made it back to her hometown of Canyon, Texas—and she brought her partner, Joe DeLeon. Thankfully, they've also brought along their guitars, banjo, harmonicas, and vocal harmonies (though they seem to have forgotten their guitar picks). 

Thank you, the world. I can die now.

We’ve finally reached that hopeful time of year. It’s the time when winter loosens its icy hold on the High Plains and the first signs of spring burgeon up from the frozen ground, dotting the naked foliage with the budding promise of warmer times to come.

One of the dinner table’s most divisive vegetables gets some High Plains love. On today’s Growing on the High Plains, everything’s coming up broccoli. This notoriously-fussy grower has been the bane of many a gardener, but there are a few tricks about managing planting time and growing conditions to cultivate a successful crop, from stem to floret.

The West Texas A&M University Distinguished Lecture Series will present Dr. Travis Langley in a presentation titled “Psychology of Superheroes” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29 in the Hazlewood Lecture Hall at Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum (PPHM). Langley’s talk will explore heroism and psychology in connection with PPHM’s recently opened PDr. Travis Langleyop Culture exhibit.

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