High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR.  A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add news from NPR and regional weather reports at the top of each hour, and you have a great way to move your day along. 

Scroll down to view program playlists.

Would a pepper by any other name taste just as sweet? Or spicy? Or seasoned? On today's Growing on the High Plains, let's tip our caps to the Capsicum, blow a horn for the peppercorn, and find out "what's the dilly" with the chili. Though different as they may be, these three cousins often answer to the same name: pepper.

When curating one's seasonal planting, most veteran gardeners have their favorites. Time-saving green thumbs often prefer perennials, while those attracted to a regular change of scenery might opt for annuals. 

My passion for growing beets all started with a jar of these vibrant veggies that were homemade and pickled by a friend. Years later, I am proud to say I've reaped many a beet harvest, producing countless batches that were lovingly boiled and bequeathed to others. 

  • On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll discuss these sturdy root vegetables, their royal history, and their versatile applications -- from soup to dye to insecticide. Thankfully, beets seem to thrive on the High Pains. So I guess it's true: the beet goes on.

 

You might have noticed that our recent High Plains showers have brought forth a few amphibious fellows into yards and gardens across our region.

On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll give a little advice on how to greet these tubby-tummied pals if you see them hopping and flopping about.  

Despite their grumpy countenance, you should be happy to see them, as they can be a boon to any summer garden.

"As an artist, my goal is to remind everyone that we’re all here to take care of each other. As an entertainer, my job is to make sure we all have a good time doing it.”      

—Mudbone  

Today on High Plains Morning, HPPR listeners had the pleasure of a pre-lunch serenade and brief roots music history lesson from Mudbone.

Hear the interview and his live, in-studio performance at the link below.

There's nothing sweeter than true love, but a fresh-picked, ripe strawberry might come close.

On today's edition of Growing on the High Plains, I thought I'd honor the tremendous season we've enjoyed from our berry patch by reflecting on the history of these seedy little fellows. 

From conflicting etymologies of the strawberry's name to calls for cautious consumption given their good grounding, these petite plumpers have a juicy past indeed.  

Father's Day is coming up this weekend, and it made me think back on my own father -- a man with wit, wisdom, and a unique collection of sayings. On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll share some of his more choice expressions, sage advice, and a little history that shaped him into the man and father that he was. 

I will always cherish my many memories of my dad, and I hope this segment honors the many wonderful fathers across our region. Happy Father's Day, to listeners across the High Plains.

While our region is known for its vast plains and wide open spaces, it's not uncommon for gardeners to experience space constraints from time to time.

If April showers are supposed to bring May flowers, what will our May blizzard bring? 

On today's edition of Growing on the High Plains, I've decided to thaw out an old memory of a particularly harsh winter and the devastation of vegetation that it brought to our region.

But don't worry! It's not all frozen ground and brittle branches. This is a story that celebrates the pioneer spirit of the Plains. Despite nature's cruel cull during the winter of '91, what sprouted from the loss was a renewed sense of stewardship, community, and loving memorial. 

Are you a good witch or a bad witch?

Today on High Plains Morning, we had Scott Stine live in the studio to talk about the Bad Magik Musik Fest that takes over Sam Houston Park this SATURDAY from noon to 9p. It's famliy-friendly, dog-welcoming, and features community-minded local vendors, artists, food, and fun.

High Plains Morning was thrilled to welcome guitar instructor Homero Campos of Amarillo College and his students to play LIVE in the studio. 

First, we lined up the Suzuki Guitar Ensemble, with student ranging from age 8 to 16. These kids learn to play by ear, then they learn to read music. It's called the "mother tongue" approach, treating the music like a new language.

The students played three tunes: 

Meadow Minuet by Frank Longay

All my Loving by The Beatles

Since HPPR loves hosting brilliant artists who live in a van...don't miss HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as we present North Carolina's own folk-country dynamos, NIKKI TALLEY & JASON SHARP!

Saturday, June 17th.

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

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ALL RIGHT, High Plains! HPPR is thrilled to be hosting CARTER SAMPSON, live in Garden City, KS as part of HPPR's Living Room Concert Series. 

Wednesday, June 14th

HPPR Studios - Garden City (210 N. 7th St.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

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On today's Growing on the High Plains, we'll discuss one of my favorite -- and fleeting -- garden guests: English peas. 

When young, they're tender and refined, boasting a fresh sweetness few vegetables can match. (And in our house, given that they're one of my husband's most anticipated arrivals, they never last long.) 

Growing peas on the High Plains can be a bit tricky, but if you follow these pointers, you'll have a light crop of these pretty pods at your nimble fingertips each year.

With the first of May arriving this week, I thought it an apt time to pause and reflect on the historical traditions associated with the special day. From a Red Square affair to a celebration of weather fair, May Day has been associated with a variety of rites and rituals.

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to present THREE AMAZING FOLK MUSICIANS, live at the HPPR Studio - Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement). 

This exclusive, first-ever pop-up showcase features three Oklahoma-based folk singers: LEVI PARHAM, LAUREN BARTH, & JESSE AYCOCK!

HAPPY HOUR! Tuesday, May 9TH ~ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM CDT ~ HPPR Studios – Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement)

Suggested donation: $15.

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

SATURDAY NIGHT, 4/29! LIVE IN GARDEN CITY!

Don't miss the Band of Lovers, live in Garden City on Saturday, April 29th at HPPR Studios – Garden City! They're touring their NEW ALBUM, so come out and hear the new tunes!

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

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To conclude our three-part series on how gardeners new to our region can overcome reduced water access, today's installment of Growing on the High Plains goes underground -- literally. 

In addition to thoughtful xeriscaping and maximizing moisture with mulch, those committed to making water conservation a top priority can consider planning and installing a drip system.  With the flip of a switch, you can ensure that every drop goes  where it's needed -- saving time and energy.

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents

Gabrielle Louise - Live in Concert

Chalice Abbey, Amarillo

(2717 Stanley Street)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

Hosted by Chalice Abbey & Evocation Coffee

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Gabrielle Louise is a nationally-touring, Colorado-based troubadour noted for her poignant lyrics and lush voice. The daughter of two vagabond musicians, Gabrielle inherited the predisposition to wanderlust and song. 

You might remember that last week we reviewed important insider intel' about how to keep High Plains gardens growing without wasting water.

Today’s installment of Growing on the High Plains continues this topic, so as not to leave anyone high and dry when it comes to best practices regarding conservation.  

For those of us thirsty for tips and reminders about how we can make the most of our gardens on the High Plains, today's show will be of special interest.

Join me as I revisit the importance of planting and prepping to make the most of every drop of water -- whether it comes from our watering can or our big sky above.

You might have noticed that community gardening has grown in popularity across the High Plains and the nation in recent years. Home gardeners often feel that coming together with others to nurture shared spaces to benefit one's own community gets at the root of why we love to grow, harvest, and share the bounty. 

Impatient for impatients? Vying for violets? Coveting lovage? Eager for leeks? Looking forward to a forage? Hurtin' for dirt? 

The HPPR Living Room Concert Series is pleased to present: TERRI HENDRIX & LLOYD MAINES, live in Amarillo on Earth Day!

Saturday, April 22nd

Chamber Music Amarillo's Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p — Sugg. Donation: $15

RSVP online here, or call Jenny at 806-367-9088.

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Nothing dampens winter doldrums like that first purple peeper pushing up through your still-chilly garden or yard. (Or maybe she's white or gold?)

Whatever petals she's pushing, the first crocus remains an annual celebration of the hope and promise of the lush Spring to come.   

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains takes a long look at these punctual pals. With their knack for tackling the gale-force gusts and dry climate of our region, there's no denying the mighty crocus will ever emerge triumphant -- especially in the hearts of the winter weary.

HPPR's Living Room Concert Series presents The DustJackets - TWO SHOWS! (Garden City & St. Francis)

Shows @ 7p ~ Suggested donation: $15

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FIRST SHOW: Friday, April 14 @ HPPR Studios - Garden City, KS

RSVP HERE FOR GARDEN CITY!

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To our Crazy Beautiful fans in the HPPR area: 

 Due to restrictions on travel visas coming into the United States, Tommy & I regret that we are unable to travel to Amarillo, Texas for our 3/30 concert. It's truly beyond our control and we hope to reschedule for Fall. Please accept our apology for any inconvenience.    Peace, Tia

Mash them. Hash them. Slice, dice, or fry them. No matter how they're prepared, the potato remains one of the world's most popular side dishes. However, a little research will unearth quite a history.

On this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains, we'll dig up the dirt on this radical root vegetable -- from it's little-known origin story to it's controversial reception across the globe.

Whether whipped into wig dust, carved for a crime, or impaled for juvenile amusement, this shape-shifting spud has certainly seen a lot through its many eyes.

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