Weekend Edition on HPPR

Saturdays and Sundays at 7:00am

National news program from NPR and HPPR

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51827295e1c82a388d82b155|51827282e1c82a388d82b12d

Pages

Health
12:17 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Despite Alzheimer's, Couple Holds Tight To Old Memories

The Greenes say they take it a day at a time and relish the many long-term memories they've shared for nearly 60 years.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 10:44 am

Right now, 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. One of them is 73-year-old Pansy Greene. She's in the early stages of Alzheimer's, and she and her husband, Winston, want people to know that so far, their daily lives have changed little despite the diagnosis.

Read more
Sports
12:15 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Randonneurs Are In It For The Ride, Not The Race

Michael Bingle of Vancouver, Wash., rides through Grand Ronde, Ore., during a 400-kilometer randonnée in May.
Angela Evancie

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 10:44 am

For many of us, a single cycling event — the Tour de France — defines athleticism on two wheels. The epic race was first organized by a French newspaper editor named Henri Desgrange in 1903. But Desgrange also had a hand in the creation of a very different style of cycling: the randonnée, a long distance-ride that prizes camaraderie and self-sufficiency over flat-out speed.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
9:36 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Why Tchaikovsky's Bells And Cannons Sound Every July 4

The Boston Pops rehearses for its Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular on July 3, 2012, at the Charles River Esplanade.
Paul Marotta Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 10:44 am

The Fourth of July is just around the corner, and on the big day, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture will be heard from coast to coast, complete with fireworks and cannons. But how did a Russian composition, depicting the rout of Napoleon's Army, end up as the unofficial soundtrack for our most quintessentially American holiday?

Read more
Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
7:08 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Judge Who Struck Down Proposition 8 Knew Case Would Go Far

Judge Vaughn Walker struck down California's proposition banning gay marriage in 2010. The Supreme Court kept that ruling intact on Wednesday.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 4:25 pm

When the Supreme Court issued its decision clearing the way for same-sex marriages to resume in California, former District Judge Vaughn Walker had worked up a sweat.

"I was at the gym on the treadmill, and the television was on. So I was working up a sweat for reasons other than Proposition 8," says Walker, who now has a private practice.

Read more
NPR Story
5:59 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Death Isn't The End In 'Unfinished Song'

In the film Unfinished Song, Arthur is a curmudgeon of a man with a heart of crust who is married to Marion, a luminous woman who is gracefully confronting the end of her life. Actor Terrence Stamp joins Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon to talk about the new movie and working with actor Vanessa Redgrave.

Politics
5:59 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Did IRS Targeting Harm Tea Party Groups?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon. The U.S. Congress continues its hearings into the IRS flagging of Tea Party groups that apply for tax-exempt status. What may have been overlooked is the fact that this status would have offered little practical benefit to most of the groups that were targeted.

Joining us now to help explain all this is NPR's S.V. Date who coordinates campaign finance coverage for NPR. Shirish, thanks very much for being with us.

SHIRISH DATE, BYLINE: You're quite welcome, Scott.

Read more
Asia
5:59 am
Sat June 22, 2013

India Revives An Ancient University

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Sports
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Stanley Cup's Nostalgia Factor

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks to NPR's sports correspondent Tom Goldman about the NBA and NHL finals, and a new record for soccer player Abby Wambach.

National Security
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

How To Keep Your Smartphone Secure

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

BILL SUPERNOR: I was in a business lounge at an airport in Newark. I look at my phone and I'm moving the buttons and it was definitely behaving a little strange, maybe it was a little slow. I ripped the back off the phone, I pulled the battery out. I mean, I got off the network quickly and I didn't turn the phone back on again until I was out of that airport.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
Science
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Tawny Crazy Ants Invade Southern States

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Tawny crazy ants are invading ecosystems and homes in states including Texas and Florida, wiping out other ant species and overwhelming homeowners. Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks to Texas A&M research scientist Robert Puckett, who says the ants are "ecological steamrollers" that reproduce so fast they are nearly impossible to get rid of.

Latin America
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Brazil Protests Continue

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
News
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

The Pioneer Of Parking Dies At 91

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now, we're going to remember the man known as Mr. Valet. He pioneered valet parking in Los Angeles more than sixty years ago. He died this past week at the age of 93. NPR's Mandalit del Barco profiled Herb Citrin a few years ago, and we're going to hear a bit of her story right now.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

Read more
National Security
2:58 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Keeping Track Of The 'Security-Industrial Complex'

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Here in the United States, the NSA revelations are also prompting concerns about privacy as well as questions about the involvement of private companies in government spying. Robert O'Harrow, an investigative reporter with The Washington Post wrote in his 2005 book, "No Place to Hide", about what he calls the security industrial complex in this country. Mr. O'Harrow believes the NSA's dealings with private companies are much wider than what we've been told.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:06 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Natalie Cole Takes Her Own Turn 'En Español'

Natalie Cole's new Spanish-language album is an homage to the one her father, Nat King Cole, released in 1958.
Jack Guy Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 2:19 pm

The great Nat King Cole had many firsts. He was the first African-American musician to have his own show — on network radio, then television. He was also one of the first, if not the first American artist to record an album in Spanish: Cole Español. It was a huge, rather unexpected hit in 1958, when Latin American music was still relatively unknown in the U.S. His success with Cole Español was so great, he recorded two more albums in Spanish.

Read more
Movie Interviews
12:44 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Coppola And Watson On Teens, Fame And 'Bling'

Emma Watson, who shot to global fame as the level-headed, resourceful Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter films, admits there's a certain irony in her playing a teenager who burgles the homes of celebrities.
Merrick Morton A24

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 2:30 pm

Sofia Coppola is no stranger to filmic explorations of fame, privilege and self-loathing in the modern age. In her newest movie, The Bling Ring, she considers the case of a gang of well-off L.A. teenagers whose obsession with celebrity took them to some unexpected places — including the homes of Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan, where they stole millions of dollars' worth of jewelry and clothes and shoes.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:20 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Presents From The President: What Obama Gives His Friends

President Obama meets with speechwriter Jon Favreau in the Oval Office in 2009.
Pete Souza White House via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 4:59 pm

Between his trip to Europe last week and his travels to Africa next week, President Obama is doing a lot of gift exchanges with foreign leaders.

In the past, he has gotten mixed reviews. Four years ago, he was panned for giving the queen of England an iPod. Other presents have gone over better. But the president does not personally select these gifts — a staffer does.

Read more
Movies
12:03 am
Sat June 22, 2013

'Me' Too: For Gru, Another Shot At Global Domination

He's still a would-be world-conquerer by day, but Gru (left, with minions) has been settling into his role as an adoptive dad by night. His new responsibilities make him a likely recruit for the Anti-Villain League, which asks him to ... well, we shouldn't give too much away.
Universal

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:07 am

There will be hits and misses at movie houses this summer, but it's a decent bet Despicable Me 2 will end up in the that-went-well column.

The star, a would-be world-dominating supervillain named Gru, is a hulking, blustering figure with an appetite for mayhem — and a surprising soft spot. He'll boast that he's about to pull off "the crime of the century," then sit down to read his little girls — he's recently, reluctantly, adopted three of them, and they're adorable — a bedtime story.

Read more
NPR Story
8:49 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Moderate Wins Iran's Presidential Election

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Iranian interior minister has announced on state TV that Hasan Rowhani has won that country's presidential election. Mr. Rowhani reportedly won 53 percent of the vote. He's considered a moderate on Iran's political spectrum. Karim Sadjadpour is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and joins us. Thanks very much for being with us.

KARIM SADJADPOUR: Thank you.

SIMON: How do you read this election result?

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Hoops, Hockey Championships Still Undecided

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And I wait all week to say: time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: Finals time - on ice and the hardwood. The Heat and the Spurs are tied at two games each in the NBA Finals. And tonight, the Chicago Blackhawks take on the Boston Bruins in game two of hockey's Stanley Cup. Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine joins us from the studios of New England Public Radio in Amherst. Howard, thanks for being with us.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

How U.S. Arms Will Reach Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Islamabad Reservoir Cools Pakistanis

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Most people look forward to summer, but perhaps not in Pakistan. NPR's Philip Reeves has been out and about in its capital city, and sent us this letter from Islamabad.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Rain, Cooler Weather Slow Colorado Fire

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. In Colorado, cooler weather and some rain has helped crews begin to get a handle on the Black Forest fire that's burning just north of Colorado Springs. Yesterday, several thousand people were allowed back into their homes, but an estimated 30,000 people remain evacuated from the area.

The blaze has claimed two lives, and it has destroyed at least 473 homes. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from Colorado Springs.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Turkish Protesters Refuse To Leave Gezi Park

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Protesters who were camped out in Istanbul's Gezi Park say they won't pack up and go home despite a government offer to avoid bulldozing the park without court approval and a public referendum. Protest organizers say that other demands such as releasing detained protesters have not been met.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

What Whitey Bulger Means To Boston

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Whitey Bulger is finally on trial ,after 16 years on the run. The Boston mobster who was once on the FBI's Most Wanted List is accused of murdering 19 people, as well as extortion and racketeering. Prosecution alleges he worked as an FBI informant in exchange for protection. Dick Lehr is the co-author, with Gerald O'Neill, of "Whitey: The Life of America's Most Notorious Mobster." He joins us from member station WBUR in Boston. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: Dick Lehr's co-author is Gerard O'Neill.] Dick, thanks for being with us.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Are The Protests In Turkey Really About A Park?

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

We have to remind ourselves now, the nationwide protests in Turkey began with a small group of people who were protesting the government's plans to pave over a small park in Istanbul. Elif Shafak is an award-winning writer who divides her time between Istanbul and London. We spoke with her yesterday, and asked her how what began as a kind of modest stand to protect a city park broadened into nationwide protests.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Flocking To The Fudge Capital

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Tomorrow isn't just Father's Day. It's also National Fudge Day if that didn't come up on your calendar. By most accounts, the first batch of fudge was cooked up in Baltimore in the 1880s, but Mackinac Island in northern Michigan is considered the modern day fudge capital of America.

Michigan Public Radio's Rick Pluta reports.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Will The Court's Gene Ruling Stifle Bio Innovation?

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Thursday that patenting natural human genetic material must stop. But the court also ruled that synthetically produced DNA is fair. The decision was prompted by patents on a gene test for breast cancer which was issued to Myriad Genetics of Salt Lake City. We're joined now in our studio by Arthur Caplan, who's head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU's Langone Medical Center. Thanks very much for being with us.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 am
Sat June 15, 2013

"Music Man" Finds A Home For His Vinyl

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Last year, we brought you the story of Music Man Murray. Murray Gershenz was looking for a buyer for the enormous record collection that was shelved in his store in Los Angeles. Now, notice I said record. Most of his music was indeed on old vinyl. Murray was turning 90 and his overstuffed store was becoming more than he could handle.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "MUSIC MAN MURRAY")

Read more
The Record
12:28 am
Sat June 15, 2013

Pandora Buys A Radio Station, Songwriters' Group Calls It A 'Stunt'

Blake Morgan's songs were played some 28,000 times over a 90-day period on Pandora, earning $1.62 in royalties.
Jim Herrington Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

This week, the Internet radio broadcaster Pandora made what seems like a backward move — technologically speaking. Pandora purchased a local radio station in Rapid City, S.D. The company says it's aiming to get the more favorable royalty rates given to terrestrial broadcasters, but the move has songwriters and composers up in arms.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:27 am
Sat June 15, 2013

'I'm Not The Only One': Transgender Youth Battle The Odds

Once homeless herself, Kimberly McKenzie now works for Lamp Community, a nonprofit that helps the homeless.
Gloria Hillard for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 11:40 am

Despite a number of victories for gay rights and national polls reflecting a growing acceptance of gay men and women, there is a population within the LGBT community that often feels left out of the national debate.

Read more

Pages