High Plains Public Radio

HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Kansas Memory, Kansas Historical Society

HPPR listeners thinking about the theme of this year’s book club--Borders and Becoming--need to keep in mind that borders change to meet the needs of those who live within them. Over the last two and a half centuries, the parameters of the United States changed repeatedly. A modern day description of the contiguous states would include Folksinger Woody Guthrie’s first stanza of “This Land Is Your Land.”

Today on High Plains Morning, we were thrilled to host SHEL, a Fort Collins, CO AND Nashville-based troupe of four sisters who have been writing and performing together since they were kids.

Currently on tour with their 2nd LP, Just Crazy Enough, SHEL wanted to high-five the High Plains -- so they stopped in to play us a few tunes!

As promised, here's the link to their delightful new video, "You Could Be My Baby."

The Fall Read - Refugees on the High Plains

Sep 23, 2016
www.humanosphere.org

As the Radio Readers move on from this month’s book Enrique’s Journey to October’s read, Dave Eggar’s book on the story Somali immigrants titled What is the What, we continue themes of separation from family, intense dangers in fleeing one’s homeland and eventual settlement and adjustment to life in the U.S. In the past decade, Amarillo has welcomed a large refugee resettlement program placing refugees from the likes of Burma, Iran, Iraq, Congo, Syria, Afghanistan, and Cuba among other countries.

KFOR

A temporary exhibit at Oklahoma City’s City Hall this week is drawing attention to many of the state’s “Most Endangered Historic Places” in hopes of protecting these priceless sites, reports KFOR.

One Neighbor's Story - Looking Back

Sep 21, 2016
ESTHER HONIG / KCUR 89.3 - Harvest Public Media

Greta Clark serves at the Director of Multicultural Programs at Dodge City Community College.  In the course of her work, she hears the stories of many immigrants who’ve come to the U.S. in search of better lives, safety, and goals and dreams.  Here she talks with one student who’s made a career translating for the district court and for immigration. He states that he is independent and has a job helping people resolve their problems.

Our Neighbors - One Woman's Story

Sep 21, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina

Maria:  I came here because I love this country.  I came here to see my sister.  I was in Mexico and I came crossing the river.  The Rio Bravo.  It was dangerous.  It was hard.  But I came here because the life is better than my country.  This is a blessed country.  I love this country.

I find good job.  I have a good life here because now I can help the people. When the people have problems, they ask me what they need to do to solve their problems.  Can I help them. 

Our Neighbors - Marcos Morales Part Two

Sep 20, 2016
ANDREW REYNOLDS - Canyon TX

Marcos: My name is Marcos Morales Satino.  I am glad to share my story with Radio Readers Book Club.

Greta: Please tell us the about the life of your family that is still in Guatemala.  What kind of life do they live compared to the life that you are living today in Dodge City?

Where I'm From

Sep 19, 2016

Audio Pending...

Hi, I’m Lynn Boitano in Garden City Kansas for the HPPR Readers Reader’s Book Club exploring the theme: Stories, Borders and Becoming.  Reading our recent book Enrique’s Journey I’m reminded of the indelible impressions that our families make on us through the daily routines, traditions, sacrifices and time spent together. 

All of these interactions accumulate to create our family story.  As a 6th grade reading teacher in district that’s rich in cultural diversity I’ve had the opportunity to get a glimpse into my students’ family stories and witness the strong bonds that bind families together across many cultures.

The Plains Belongs to Anyone Hardy Enough

Sep 14, 2016
KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

My name is Megan Hope. I’m a native of Garden City, Kansas, now living in Denver, Colorado. I’ve spent most of the last two decades working among immigrant communities, a path that has everything to do with growing up on the High Plains.  

As I was settling into grade school in the early 1980s, southwest Kansas was being transformed by an influx of Latino immigrants and resettled Southeast Asian refugees, the primary workforce for two new meatpacking plants.

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series

Presents High Plains folk music icon,

RANDY PALMER

HPPR Studios (210 N. 7th St.)

Garden City, KS

Doors @ 6:30p | Show @ 7p

Suggested Donation: $15

A Never Ending Exodus

Sep 12, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina

In my own family History, in 1846 my great great grandfather Alma Helaman Hale was 10 years old when he lost his parents as they lived on the Missouri river near Council Bluffs, Iowa. Alma then joined the Mormon pioneers and with his three siblings traveled from their home to the Salt Lake Valley to settle with Brigham Young as he declared, “This is the Place!” One biography states “At this point we can only conclude that Alma became a man at the tender age of ten. There could be no idleness. The full effort of every person was needed just to keep alive.” In Sonia Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey she describes the immigrants as “facing north, toward a new land, a never-ending exodus.” (70) For many, this is a religious journey towards a land of new promise. Nazario describes some that bring “a tiny drawing of San Cristóbal, the patron saint of travelers, or of San Judas Tadeo, the patron saint of desperate situations” (70).

Tinta negra / Black Ink

Sep 9, 2016
XANATH CARAZA

Edit

Xánath Caraza reads two bilingual poems from her latest book Tinta negra / Black Ink.   In one she asks, "

What is a border? Created limits

cultures forced to turn their back

The Wichita Eagle

For many, Kansas brings to mind the image of flickering wheat fields. But the state has had more than its share of celebrities and luminaries.

The Wichita Eagle has published a list of 19 famous people—and 2 animals—that spent time in Kansas. Military leaders on the list include Colin Powell, who was once deputy commander at Fort Leavenworth, and George Patton, who was stationed at Fort Riley before World War I.

One Neighbor's Story

Sep 7, 2016
ANDREW REYNOLDS - Canyon TX

Hi, my name is Marcos Morales.I’m glad to share my story with the Radio Readers Book Club.  I have been here in southwest of Kansas since November of 2003.  I am from Guatemala from a little poor place. I came here because my dad brought me here in U.S.A.  He’s here with me.  I came here because I thought I had more opportunity than living in my country because when I was younger what I thought was to go to school to have a career, improve myself so that’s one of the reasons that I came.  And that’s what I am doing right now.

Imagining America

Sep 5, 2016
blogs.loc.gov

In Sonia Nazario’s description of what draws Lourdes to take the treacherous journey north from Honduras to the U.S., she writes: “On television, she saw New York City’s spectacular skyline, Las Vegas’s shimmering lights, Disneyland’s magic castle.” (4) 25 pages later Lourdes’ son Enrique misses his mother and is also strongly attracted to the U.S. Nazario similarly expresses that “Enrique sees New York City’s spectacular skyline, Las Vegas’s shimmering lights, Disneyland’s magic castle.” (28-9). Little do Lourdes and Enrique know that Latinos make up almost 30% of New York City’s population. There is almost three times the number of Puerto Ricans in New York City than in San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital. Additionally, there are about as many Dominicans in New York City as in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic and home to almost 1 million people. New York is a dramatically Hispanic city.

Guatemala to the High Plains - Unaccompanied

Sep 2, 2016
ESTHER HONIG / KCUR 89.3

In the small, rural city of Liberal, Kansas, a neighborhood of old trailer homes sits just off the main street. The small trailer at the end of the block, with faded yellow paint and creaky front steps, is the place 17-year-old Diego now calls home.

Objects from the Borderlands

Aug 31, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina / iah.unc.edu

In 2007 I began making yearly trips/pilgrimages to walk the border and photograph objects left behind by undocumented migrants crossing the U.S–Mexico border between Matamoros, Mexico, and Brownsville, Texas. My work takes an ever-evolving imagined space and concretizes it as a collection of specific objects, first as they are found and photographed in the landscape, then as they are re-photographed and archived, and, finally, as they are united in exhibitions.

jasonboyett.com

An Amarillo author has written two books aimed at introducing nationwide audiences to the world’s religions, using everyday language. Jason Boyett’s latest book, on the 12 major religions of the world, becomes available today.

Boyett grew up Southern Baptist, but in school he became fascinated with religions different from his own. He says his main goal with the new book was to be fair, and he sees the work as an effort to explain rather than convince. “Every religion has something from which we could learn,” Boyett added.

Crystal Yates - Live in Amarillo 

Friday, Sept. 9th @ The Chalice Abbey

(2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia & Wolflin) 

$15 Sugg. Donation

Art reception @ 6p  |  Music @ 8:30p

RSVP online or by calling 806.367.9088!

"Powerful." "Magical." "Inspiring." 

Mike Kepka / The San Francisco Chronicle

This month the US lost one of its great children’s authors. Joyce Carol Thomas rose to prominence through highlighting her experience as an African American in rural Oklahoma.

Thomas wrote books and poems for children and young adults that accented her heritage, work that eventually garnered he a National Book Award. She grew up working in Oklahoma cotton fields, and published her first book, Marked by Fire, in 1982.

Faith, Family and Endurance in the Face of Danger

Aug 29, 2016
SUSAN HARBAGE PAGE

In 2013 there were over 3 million Central American immigrants living in the U.S. Each year hundreds of immigrants die while attempting to cross the southern U.S. border. From 2014 to July, 31 2015 alone, 72,968 unaccompanied children from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras were apprehended at the U.S. border with Mexico.  “Each year the Obama administration has seen more deportations than any preceding president”[1].

The Road to or from?

Aug 26, 2016
JENNY INZERILLO - Amarillo, Texas

Towards the end of My Antonia, Jim Burden, at this point in the novel, a middle-aged success story, returns to Nebraska, determined to see his childhood friend, Antonia.  Her home is comfortably bucolic—ducks and geese quacking in the yard, cats sunning on the porch, young women laughing as they wash dishes. Sure, Antonia appears older than she is, and much older than Jim, but Jim admires her, noting, “whatever else was gone [of her youth and beauty, we suppose], Antonia had not lost the fire of life.” From Jim’s perspective, Antonia is “a rich mine of life.”

 

BAND OF LOVERS IS BACK!!!

Friday, August 26th - Live in Amarillo
The Fibonacci Space (Chamber Music Amarillo)
3306 SW 6th Ave. |  Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
$15 Suggested Donation  

RSVP online here, or call the studio (after 12p CST) and we'll put you on the list: 806.367.9088.

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Sean Steffen / Amarillo Globe-News

This past weekend, young filmmakers in Amarillo participated in a harrowing competition. The effort was part of a nationwide contest called the 48-Hour Film Project. Actors, producers, directors and photographers from Amarillo raced around town, bringing their stories to life.

Their Stories Are Ours

Aug 24, 2016
Unknown

If you like watching Andy Griffith reruns, you might enjoy living in a small town in the listening area of High Plains Public Radio. Those of us who call these little burgs home enjoy a quality of life that is generally slow-paced, friendly, and satisfying on many levels. Life wasn’t always so idyllic.

Jonathan Baker

I’m Jonathan Baker, a writer in Canyon, Texas, and I’ve been asked to talk about Willa Cather’s My Antonia.

I have an addiction. I take photos constantly with my phone. Sometimes in West Texas, during a particularly epic sunset, I’ll instinctively start driving west, away from town, out where there are no buildings. Where the good views are.

Later, when I go back and look at my images, I often find I have no nostalgia for the day I snapped the photo of a particular sky. Because I was looking at my phone the whole time.

Library of Congress

The Great Plains is its own eco-niche with distinctive plants, mammals, birds, weather, and history that constantly evolve. Its human population is as dynamic as these other unique factors. Those of us whose families have lived here for generations understand the world Willa Cather describes in My Antonia. Our families lived her stories. When we read them, we wonder how we got where we are today.

Who Cares about What Happens in Nebraska? We Do.

Aug 19, 2016
Kansas Memory, Kansas Historical Society

To write about life on the plains might not seem like much of a risk today, but, at the turn of the last century, Willa Cather knew what she was up against when she made immigrant farmers – people she knew as a child growing up in Nebraska—her central characters.

Bill Blankenship / Topeka Capital-Journal

The Topeka Capital-Journal recently described the Kansas State Historical Society’s archives as “Kansas’s scrapbook.” In the society’s archive wing you’ll find 70 million pieces of paper. These include government records; unpublished letters, diaries and other materials; an extensive photograph collection with images from all of the state’s counties; and books related to Kansas history.

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