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Culture:
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Arts:
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Wikimedia Commons

From Mexico to Canada and pretty much everywhere between, Time's Money has published a month-by-month guide to the best destinations for travel in, based on when the best bargains are in place.

This year, Time’s Money edition is basing the picks on taking advantage of currency shifts and travel trends to find travelers the best destinations to visit on a budget.

       LIVE IN AMARILLO!

Putnam Smith & Ashley Storrow
Friday, January 27th
 Chalice Abbey(2717 Stanley)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
$15 Suggested Donation
RSVP online or call 806.367.9088!

 

 

 

chroniclebooks.com

The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture has named its annual “Book of the Year.” As the Farm Bureau’s website reports, this year’s award goes to Eugenie Doyle for her book, Sleep Tight Farm.

Wikimedia Commons

What better words are there to hear in the midst of bitterly cold temperatures than the Virgin Island wants to pay you to come there for a visit?

Wikimedia Commons

A Kansas-made film about a Kansas-made song will premiere later this month in Wichita.

Book highlights women's contributions to astronomy

Jan 1, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

National Geographic recently published an interview with the author of a book about the many women who made contributions to astronomy.

The history of celebrating the arrival of a new year

Dec 30, 2016

New Year’s Day and the name for the first month of the year, known these days as January, each stem from ancient Rome.

Several scientific breakthroughs made in 2016

Dec 27, 2016

From the moment that Einstein’s theory of gravity was proven when two black holes slammed together, to the discovery of a region of space where the temperature is right for liquid water, and by extension, life, 2016 was full of scientific breakthroughs.

CIA

History and geography buffs will rejoice at the opportunity to view once top-secret maps being released by the Central Intelligence Agency.

As the Smithsonian Magazine and National Geographic reports, in celebration of the CIA’s 75th anniversary, the agency has declassified and made decades of once-secret maps online.

Featuring Kansas author Thomas Fox Averill

Thomas Fox Averill, an O. Henry Award Winner, is Writer-in-residence and Professor of English at Washburn University of Topeka, Kansas;  where he teaches courses in Creative Writing and in Kansas Literature, Folklore and Film.  He has published four novels, one of which includes A Carol Dickens Christmas (2014).  

Public Domain

Few baby boomers can flip through old photo albums without finding black and white pictures featuring themselves, siblings, and cousins as youngsters. They often show off cowboy hats with stampede strings tied tight under their chins, fuzzy chaps, and belts holding plastic six shooters that fired red ribbons of firecracker-scented caps. Not many escaped that ache to ride the range on a stick horse or to rope sad-faced pups and kittens. Watching Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, and the Lone Ranger on those two-channel TVs fueled dreams and guided neighborhood shootouts.

Memories of Pearl Harbor, Japanese internment camp

Dec 6, 2016
Amache.org

The Amache Japanese Internment camp held over 7,000 Japanese – mostly American citizens – from 1942 to 1945 following the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor that left over 2,400 dead and over 1,100 wounded.

Variety of religious holidays celebrated in December

Dec 5, 2016

If you’re searching for a holiday greeting that covers the myriad of religious holidays and observances celebrated in December, "Happy Holidays" really does cover it. 

According to 2016 Inter-faith calendar, the month of December is chock-full of holidays including those observed by Christians, Buddhists, Muslims, pagans, Jews and Zoroastrians.

mommypotamus.com

Despite the fact I had a flu shot the minute the doctor made them available, one of those germs invaded, took up residence in my ears, lungs, and sinuses, and has hung around with his buddies far too long. I’ve taken antibiotics and added a few homeopathic treatments to see if I can send this invader packing. Some of my self-care, which includes slathering Vicks on my feet and wearing cotton socks to bed, has offered comfort but not a cure. Several sympathetic friends recommended taking elderberry elixir, and one provided a bottle of his homebrew. When I looked up elderberries, it appears science agrees that syrups made from this native fruit have successfully evicted this nasty attacker and its accompanying symptoms.

Lynn Lane / Texas Observer

When folks talk about Texas cuisine, they often think of Tex-Mex or barbecue or chicken fried steak. But Lone Star chef Adán Medrano wants to make sure we don’t forget Texas’s first cuisine.

Medrano is a lover of what he calls Texas Mexican food. As The Texas Observer reports, Texas Mexican is the cuisine of the Mexican-American community of Texas, whose ancestors are the Native Americans who first lived here 12,000 years ago.

History.com

This holiday, here’s a little known story about Thanksgiving in America, courtesy of TIME magazine.

Many schoolchildren learn that the first Thanksgiving occurred between Wampanoag Indians and English Pilgrims at the Plymouth Colony in 1621.

John F. Kennedy even mentioned Plymouth as the site of the first Thanksgiving in a speech. When he made this declaration, a Virginia Senator objected, saying the first Thanksgiving was actually celebrated in Virginia in 1619, two years before the Plymouth celebration.

John Tlumacki / Boston Globe

Here’s a poem for Thanksgiving:

The Harvest Moon by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes

And roofs of villages, on woodland crests

And their aerial neighborhoods of nests

Deserted, on the curtained window-panes

Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes

And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!

Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,

With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!

All things are symbols: the external shows

CSAW/WTAMU

A new venture at West Texas A&M University is drawing a lot of buzz across the High Plains. The Center for the Study of the American West was launched this fall and has already positioned itself as one of the jewels in WT’s crown.

The project’s sponsor, Dr. Alex Hunt, says the Center’s role is to foster interdisciplinary research, teaching, and public outreach relevant to the American West.

Andipantz/Getty/Bloomberg / Animation: Sheryl Sulistiawan

American travelers may not have noticed, but a legendary American roadside icon has been fading away in recent years.

As Bloomberg reports, “(No) Vacancy” signs are vanishing from American highways.

These neon signs have been greeting road-weary travelers for generations--unless the “No” is lit before “Vacancy.” In that case, the sign has become a famous symbol of disappointment.

Why They Come Here

Nov 11, 2016
ANNE HOLT, Edina, Minnesota

Following is a provocative story shared by a reader.  On Sunday, November 13, 2016, HPPR Radio Readers Book Club will be discussing thoughts about immigrants and their stories.  We hope you'll join us.

From Anne --

I know. You want me to shut up. I love you, but I don't care.

On this day two years ago, I, along with some of the best human beings I know, visited a wall with nearly 30,000 names of human beings who were killed or disappeared in El Salvador during the 1980s. And it’s said to be an incomplete list.

Bettman & Halpin

Live in Amarillo: Friday, November 18th
Doors @ 7p ~ Show @ 7:30p
Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia, Near Wolflin)
$15 Suggested Donation

Please let us know you're coming!
You can RSVP online, or call 806.367.9088.

We're All From . . .

Nov 8, 2016

As we conclude the HPPR Radio Readers Fall 2016 Read, I’m gratified for each challenging and meaningful discussion about the changing faces of, well, the faces of our communities.

Where I'm From

Nov 3, 2016

Hi, I’m Lynn Boitano in Garden City Kansas for the HPPR Readers Reader’s Book Club exploring the theme: Stories, Borders and Becoming.  Reading our recent book Enrique’s Journey I’m reminded of the indelible impressions that our families make on us through the daily routines, traditions, sacrifices and time spent together. 

All of these interactions accumulate to create our family story.  As a 6th grade reading teacher in district that’s rich in cultural diversity I’ve had the opportunity to get a glimpse into my students’ family stories and witness the strong bonds that bind families together across many cultures.

National Archive/Newsmakers/Getty

For some reason, Texas always seems to spring to mind when people are thinking of destruction on a huge scale.

Take the 1998 movie Armageddon, for example, in which Planet Earth is threatened by an asteroid “the size of Texas.”

The fact is, sometimes it’s not great to be intimately linked with bigness. Last week, Russia unveiled a brand new ballistic missile. The country proudly announced that the warhead is big enough “to wipe out Texas.”

Imagining America

Nov 1, 2016
blogs.loc.gov

In Sonia Nazario’s description of what draws Lourdes to take the treacherous journey north from Honduras to the U.S., she writes: “On television, she saw New York City’s spectacular skyline, Las Vegas’s shimmering lights, Disneyland’s magic castle.” (4) 25 pages later Lourdes’ son Enrique misses his mother and is also strongly attracted to the U.S. Nazario similarly expresses that “Enrique sees New York City’s spectacular skyline, Las Vegas’s shimmering lights, Disneyland’s magic castle.” (28-9). Little do Lourdes and Enrique know that Latinos make up almost 30% of New York City’s population. There is almost three times the number of Puerto Ricans in New York City than in San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital. Additionally, there are about as many Dominicans in New York City as in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic and home to almost 1 million people. New York is a dramatically Hispanic city.

Brueghel, 16th Century Belgian painting / Wikipedia

I sat, basking, recently, in the sunlight of this dying autumn season, a few butterflies flittered amongst faded zinnias and browning marigolds, a wasp sank sluggishly to my table, and I was thinking.   

The last few months…so tough…increased work demands, mounting pressures and expenses at home…a dying friend, my head cold. The shameful mockery of our democratic processes during this year’s Presidential campaign… The recent arrests of three southwest Kansans for plotting a terrorist attack on a Muslim-Somali community…. Then, the opening lines of WH Auden’s  poem, from the late 1930’s, came to mind:

About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters; how well, they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along….”

That’s me: I’m guilty. I’ve just been walking dully along. For one, I’ve not been as invested, as committed, to HPPR’s Radio Readers this fall as I could have been. But who can blame me? These books have been, well, hard.

Imagen Digital / Digital Image

Oct 28, 2016
Kathleen Holt

Today, I will read one bilingual poem from my book Conjuro.

Imagen Digital/Digital Image

“Naambo Kananfa Naambo, Guayé

Naambo Kananfa Yé

Nibela Yuku Yuku Labadiato

Naambo Sei Ta La Kananfa”

 

Objects from the Borderlands

Oct 27, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina / iah.unc.edu

In 2007 I began making yearly trips/pilgrimages to walk the border and photograph objects left behind by undocumented migrants crossing the U.S–Mexico border between Matamoros, Mexico, and Brownsville, Texas. My work takes an ever-evolving imagined space and concretizes it as a collection of specific objects, first as they are found and photographed in the landscape, then as they are re-photographed and archived, and, finally, as they are united in exhibitions.

FALLOU NDIAYE

Hi, my name is Fallou Ndiaye.  I am originally from Senegal, West Africa.  I currently live in Garden City, Kansas. My story of coming to the United States began when I worked at the Embassy in Senegal because Senegal is the long ally of the United States. The last three Presidents visited Senegal, so when I work there, they welcome you and greet you in a respectful way and give me visa to get my chance to come here in the United States.

When I came here, I learned that the opportunities are open to everyone – to everyone who wants to move up, they give you a chance to do it. So, every place since then, I work more than a decade. I was looking for a job and they give me that job, the same job they provide to everyone.  So, even if I don’t speak the language at that time very clearly to them, they help me.  They help me and guide me and train me as they train American people to do the job like everybody.

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