HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

Renfree Isaacs - Live in Concert!

Saturday, October 21st

The Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP ONLINE NOW! or call 806.367.9088.

***This show is sponsored by Evocation Coffee & Chamber Music Amarillo.****

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to announce the The RandyBoys—Music Ambassador Tour 2017. They'll be bringing HPPR's Living Room Concerts to 18 communities across the High Plains, including the Texas & Oklahoma Panhandles, Western Kansas, and Eastern Colorado. From October 17 thru Nov 9th, Randy and Randy will be cruising across our listening area. Click here to find out if they're coming to YOUR town! 

On September 22nd, High Plains Public Radio headed over to Albuquerque, NM for one of the most inspirational music festivals in the US: ¡Globalquerque! This world music collective brings together global artists in a way no other festival does, with inspirational, soul-lifting performances. It takes place each year at the National Hispanic Cultural Center—an incredible space for a truly unique festival. Performances take place across three stages: the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theater, & dance outside on the Plaza Mayor. You can learn more about the Global Fiesta free Saturday daytime programming and the Global Village of Crafts, Culture and Cuisine.

Today's edition of Growing on the High Plains asks you to hearken to our High Plains history as we ponder the lot of early pioneers, especially what harvest time meant to them. 

Library of Congress

I believe in Jackalopes. They exist in postcards, seen throughout the western plains at truck stops. They must be real. This is one story I have heard about a particular jackalope named Jack, who is the hero of my book called Jackalope, from Red Mountain Press in Santa Fe.

Autumn is here, so let's celebrate with hot coffee, cookies, and LIVE FOLK MUSIC from Chicago singer-songwriter HEATHER STYKA! 

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HEATHER STYKA - Live in Amarillo

Saturday, Oct. 14

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP today! This will be a GREAT SHOW!

 

Radio Readers BookByte: Six Degrees of Separation

Oct 9, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Hello, Radio Readers.  This is Valerie Brown-Kuchera, talking to you again from Quinter.  I’m introducing our final selection, Edible Stories by Mark Kurlansky.  You might recognize the author because he’s also responsible for the Federal Writers’ Project collection The Food of a Younger Land, which was our first book in Food and Story. 

Radio Readers BookByte: Harper Breakfast -- or Not

Oct 6, 2017
Jason Harper / Hays, Kansas

Hello. This is Jason Harper in Hays, Kansas. Earlier this morning I was looking at the clock, waiting to take a work break, when I remembered something that happened a couple of years ago: "The Breakfast Bomb."

Last time we talked I mentioned how my wife May has said that before she met me, she was living alone in a bleak, dark, drafty apartment, working long hours at a law firm, and only ate ramen noodles every day because she was too busy with work to learn how to cook on her own.

Radio Readers BookByte: Edible Stories

Oct 5, 2017

Hello Radio Readers!  Now that we’ve explored the food described by Federal Writers’ Project authors in The Food of a Younger Land, and mulled over Joanne Harris’s novel of food, family, and a community caught up in the complexities of wartime occupation, Five Quarters of the Orange, it’s time to move on to the third book in our Food and Story series, Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts

Mark Kurlansky, a noted food author with best selling books on salt, cod, and oysters, throws us a real curve with Edible Stories.  His mining of the Federal Writers’ Project depression era essays in our series opener, Food of a Younger Land, did not prepare this reader for the wacky, disjointed-but-not-disjointed series of stories he creates in Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts.  I found these fictitious short stories (or are they chapters?) both delightful and baffling.  Kurlansky presents us with a parade of characters who are odd, to say the least.  He organizes this book with a motif of, yes, food, but in a most unexpected way.  Each of the sixteen stories bears the title of a specific food: “Muffins,” “Hot Pot,” “Orangina,” “The Icing on the Cake.”  The exception is the last story, titled “Margaret.” 

Radio Readers BookByte: Larger than Life

Oct 4, 2017
WIKIPEDIA

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.

The book, “Five Quarters of Orange,” by Joanne Harris brought many different emotions and thoughts to me as I read it.  As the author talked about Les Laveuses being in a small town in France, she led us to understand that the Dartigen family and community may not have suffered such oppression as those in a city.  She shares the crop failures and natural disasters that came along with the invasion of an occupying force.  These events worked together to create circumstances that encourage Boise, Cassis and Reinette to deal with the enemy soldiers.  The book shares intrigue and caring between the three youth and a particular soldier.  It is a circumstance that will keep you reading!

Courtesy / Carroll Strategies

The six-week New Mexico Chinese Lantern Festival is coming to Expo New Mexico in Albuquerque, N.M., on Oct. 6 bringing with it hundreds of larger-than-life, fully-illuminated, lanterns, as well as Chinese cultural performances and special handicrafts.

For nearly 2,000 years, the Chinese New Year has been celebrated with lanterns and lantern festivals are quickly becoming popular across the country. Similar displays attract thousands in New Orleans, Philadelphia, Columbus, Norfolk, Spokane and more.

Radio Readers BookByte: Something to Chew On

Oct 1, 2017
Jason Harper/Hays Kansas

Hello, Radio Readers – I’m  Jason Harper, food and fiction connoisseur (as well as a solely self-proclaimed chef and author) coming to you from Hays, Kansas. I’ll be talking about High Plains Public Radio Reader's Fall 2017 theme – Food and Story, delivering the final segment of my four-part Book Byte about Five Quarters of the Orange, a novel by Joanne Harris.

Radio Readers BookByte: Harper Breakfast -- or Not

Sep 29, 2017
Jason Harper / Hays, Kansas

Hello. This is Jason Harper in Hays, Kansas. Earlier this morning I was looking at the clock, waiting to take a work break, when I remembered something that happened a couple of years ago: "The Breakfast Bomb."

Last time we talked I mentioned how my wife May has said that before she met me, she was living alone in a bleak, dark, drafty apartment, working long hours at a law firm, and only ate ramen noodles every day because she was too busy with work to learn how to cook on her own.

Pintrest

This is George Laughead of Lawrence and Dodge City.  I grew up in Dodge, as did my father and my grandfather, who was on the first city commission.   My cookbook recommendation comes with a personal note.  I have a recipe in The New Kansas Cookbook: Rural Roots, Modern Table by Frank and Jayni Carey with beautiful illustrations by Louis Copt and published by the University of Kansas Press.  I’ll come back to that cookbook in a minute and explain why I have a Moroccan style recipe in it.

Food had always had a big effect in Dodge.  A lot of people had to be fed because of the Santa Fe Depot and all the buses that went through in the 1950s and 1960s.  There were probably 20 trains a day.  There was a lot of hotel space in downtown Dodge City.  It doesn’t have that now.  There were hundreds and hundreds of rooms.  The Harvey House set a standard and the women’s church groups were always a feature at each community holiday or event. There were thousands of travelers, so there were many restaurants, cafes, bars and grills. 

Radio Readers BookByte: Orange Wine

Sep 28, 2017
Meagan Zampieri / Norton, Kansas

Greetings, Radio Readers, I’m Meagan Zampieri, here in Norton, KS. I hope you’re having a wonderful Autumn … Myself, as I read these selections from our Fall Read—Food and Story, I have appreciated the opportunity to reflect and write about the most important things in my life. Which is that

I am growing a son.

I keep coming back to that thought –after reading Five Quarters of the Orange, the story of a young girl’s life during the Nazi occupation of France. Joanne Harris is crafty, creating empathy for those who aided the Third Reich’s occupation of the French countryside.  

There is a metaphor that Framboise, the grown-child narrator, uses mid book—describing her mother’s parenting style. That she treated her children like trees in her orchard. That you plant them and feed them, trim them back often and correctly, and they will grow strong and true. Clip them back. Pluck their fruit.

It’s barbaric, no?

Radio Readers Book Byte: In Times of Distress

Sep 27, 2017
Melany Wilks / Colby, KS

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.  

The book, “Five Quarters of Orange,” by Joanne Harris talks about food in the midst of WWII.  I kept being drawn to the fact that the families had homes and farms where they normally grew food for their lives. But that the soldiers came in and took what they had grown or stored. When the floods came and the weather destroyed the crops the community really began to suffer.

As Francoise Simon is describing her family having to harvest the fruit from the trees when all that was left was rotten fruit in habited by hornets.  And the need to pick the fruit, then boil the fruit and skim off the insects from the top of the jam or syrup.  Sounds really gross but that is what happens when food is scarce.

Wikimedia Commons

The State Fair of Texas gets underway next week in Dallas, and every year the list of edible oddities seems to get stranger.

And that’s no mean feat, as it will be hard to top last year’s deep-fried Doritos bacon mozzarella cheese stick.

FINALLY, our FIRST installment of FOLK'TOBER SATURDAY NIGHTS

HPPR's Living Room Concert Series presents TWO Amarillo troubadours, together in concert: James Lee Baker & Ray Wilson

Live in Amarillo ~ Sat., Oct. 7th

Chamber Music Amarillo

The Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation $15

RSVP ONLINE, or call 806.367.9088 to reserve your seat!

Radio Readers BookByte: Food as a Weapon

Sep 25, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Hello, Radio Readers – I am Jason Harper, food and fiction connoisseur (as well as solely self-proclaimed chef and author) coming to you from Hays, Kansas. Today, I’ll be talking about High Plains Public Radio Reader's Fall 2017 theme – Food and Story, delivering part three of my four-part Book Byte about Five Quarters of the Orange, a novel by Joanne Harris.

Today, my focus is that the characters in Five Quarters of the Orange use food as a weapon.

In the novel, the narrator describes how she, as a child, would bring oranges surreptitiously into the house because the very smell of them would trigger her mother's migraines, thus buying the child hours of freedom after her mother took heavy narcotics and lay in bed. Unbeknownst to her, these frequent headaches and that "medicine" she took led to a crippling opiate addiction.

Albert Mock / Flickr Creative Commons

It has now been 10 years since Amarillo’s Western Plaza was demolished, and The Amarillo Globe-News has published a brief remembrance of what was for many years Amarillo’s largest shopping mall.

In fact, upon its construction in 1968, Western Plaza was said to be the biggest mall between Denver and Dallas. The 400,000 square foot shopping mall’s first tenant was Montgomery Ward.

Radio Readers BookByte: Two Deer

Sep 21, 2017
CREATIVE COMMONS

Deer fascinate me, and sighting them is always magical, maybe because they move so effortlessly, compared to us.

Here are two deer poems, “Levitation” and “White Deer Chirascuro.”

Chirascuro is an Italian term for high contrast paintings, where black background emphasizes the light.

Levitation

The psychic says ghosts float

above ground. When deer waver

in sunrise fog over asphalt,

I believe. Front-on, only ears show

but sideways, slanting northward,

full bodies appear—soft-tan fur,

solid torsos, brown cherub eyes.

Don't miss Rob Gerhardt's traveling photography exhibit, "Muslim American / American Muslim," on display now at Mercer Art Gallery  (801 N. Campus Dr.) at Garden City Community College. He will be hosting a talk this Thursday, Sept. 21st at 7:30 pm CST at the Pauline Joyce Fine Arts Auditorium (801 N. Campus Dr.). 

Melany Wilks / Colby, KS

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.

Today, I am bringing you some thoughts that I had as I read Five Quarters of the Orange, by Joanne Harris.  Our subject discussion is on food and story this quarter.  As I read the book so many stories came into my mind.

Joanne Harris the author places the Francoise Simon in a small town, Les Laveuses. Mirabelle Dartigen shares how her mother wrote all her best recipes down in a book and handed them down to her daughter. In the midst of the recipes were snatches of history of life, especially during WWII.  It reminded me how my mother always wrote in the recipe books she used. She’d write down when it was first used it and what the occasion was.  Then she would write down how she changed the recipe to make it better or easier. 

The City of Stratton, Colorado is looking to engage the community through the arts on November 3rd with a new FIRST FRIDAY ART EXHIBITION!

Thanks to art teacher Bri Hill Kastner, City Council member Lynn Gottmann, and Town Clerk Cindy McCaffrey​, this small town might get a big BOOST on the creativity front.

Radio Readers BookByte: Food Becomes Currency

Sep 19, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Hello, Radio Readers – I’m Jason Harper, food and fiction connoisseur (as well as a solely self-proclaimed chef and author) coming to you from Hays, Kansas. Food is used in several ways throughout Joanne Harris’ Five Quarters of the Orange, fictional WWII exploration of a set siblings. On multiple levels, food peppers this novel and leaves the reader with quite a lot to chew on. 

In my first Book Byte, I discussed how creating a great book is a bit the same as baking a delicious dessert, and then I compared recipe steps from Five Quarters of the Orange to the elements of storytelling.

Today, another food angle in Five Quarters of the Orange is how these characters in the novel use food as a kind of currency — partly as a currency of collusion with German soldiers. Chocolate, oranges, bread, and many more examples feed the storyline.

For centuries, food has been used as a form of money. I would like to serve up the following three morsels of trivia of how food was historically a kind of currency that might tantalize our Radio Readers: 

This week on Amarillo Symphony Presents, we're taking a little trip! First, we visit the American West with Aaron Copland's "Rodeo." Then, we're off to the UK for Ralph Vaughn Williams's "Lark Ascending." Finally, we drop by France with Gabriel Faure's "Pavane." Plus, ASO's Music Director/Conductor Jacomo Bairos talks about the upcoming 2017-18 symphony season.

Film lovers across the High Plains, you might want to mark your calendars for the Austin Film Festival (Oct. 26-Nov. 2). They have announced their "Opening Night & Centerpiece Films" for the 2017 season, which are already being touted as Oscar contenders:

Opening Night: Lady Bird from Writer/Director Greta Gerwig—Starring Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf, & Tracy Letts.

Radio Readers BookByte: Five Quarters And A Recipe

Sep 18, 2017
Open Source

Hello, Radio Readers – this is Jason Harper, a food and fiction connoisseur (as well as a solely self-proclaimed chef and author) coming to you from Hays, Kansas. Today, I’ll be talking about High Plains Public Radio's 2017 Fall Read – Food and Story, delivering part one of my four-part Book Byte about Five Quarters of the Orange, a novel by Joanne Harris.

As per her m/o in her previous work, Harris includes quite a few food references and even some recipes in Five Quarters of the Orange. One recipe from this novel in particular that caught my attention is for an Apple and Dried-Apricot dessert. It reads as follows:

Don't miss Oklahoma singer-songwriter HAVEN ALEXANDRA,with special guest, jazz/blues master MARK MONTGOMERY from Kansas City.

Saturday, September 30

HPPR Studios (210 N. 7th St.) 

Doors at 7p | Show at 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

 

RSVP online now, or call us at 806.367.9088!

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