HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Colorado Remembers the Pony Express

Jun 29, 2015
Frank Reese / Flickr

Last week, on a warm Wednesday evening, 600 riders raced on horseback across the northeastern corner of Colorado. The riders were retracing the route of the legendary Pony Express, to commemorate the mail service’s 155th anniversary.

Harper's Weekly

Shortly after the end of the Civil War, Lieutenant Colonel George Custer sent an Army search party to search for the Lieutenant Lyman Kidder and his men, who had gone missing. The searchers soon came upon the men, lying dead on the open plains, some with as many as 50 arrows. Kidder’s party had been set upon by a Sioux and Cheyenne war party.  Kidder was killed, along with an native scout and ten enlisted men.

Public Domain

In this age of chain restaurants and big box stores, the Dodge City Daily Globe has published an important reminder about the first people who lived in the Dodge City Area. These people did not live in cities or towns. Instead they moved in camps as they followed the Buffalo across the plains. The Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche and Arapaho, were nomadic, and they used the buffalo for virtually all of their needs, including food, shelter, and tools. The slaughter of the buffalo was no accident.

Daniel P. Sink of Vernon, Texas / Public Domain

According to historian Barry Scobee, Comanche Chief Quanah Parker once appeared in Big Bend seeking peyote. Glenn’s Texas History Blog reports that Parker arrived at the Lempert Hotel in Fort Davis in the waning years of the 19th century in search of the hallucinogenic cactus. It’s unclear when the Comanche first began using peyote in their shamanistic ceremonies, but anthropologist Omar C.

kristy fuller

99 people spent part of their Father’s Day at The Fibonacci, and were rewarded with an amazing afternoon of great music.  The Red River Songwriters group consists of our own Susan Gibson, Walt Wilkins, Drew Kennedy, Kelly Mickwee, Brandy Zdan and Josh Grider, and we were able to catch them on their way home from their annual songwriting camp in New Mexico.  6 top notch songwriters, 6 powerful voices, 6 guitars and 1 banjo, and a guest song from Zach Wilkerson.  What a great way to end your weekend.  If you would like to be on our e-mail list to find out about future shows, send an e-mail to

Image engraving by
J. Pass / Wellcome Library/Creative Commons

Slate reported this week on growing concerns in the scientific community about the continued necessity of the leap second. At issue is the fact that time tracked by atomic clocks diverges with time determined by the Earth’s rotation.  Every year, scientists insert a “leap second” into official time so that timepieces on Earth will match up with atomic time.

Corbis

This year commemorates the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, and the Wall Street Journal has reported on the similar careers of two of America’s most celebrated veterans of that war. George Herbert Walker Bush fought in the Pacific Arena and was shot down, and Bob Dole was wounded in Italy and left for dead on the battlefield.

As a self-appointed foodie, I often watch Diners, Drive Ins, and Dives for cooking inspiration. Guy Fieri’s success at seeking eateries with reputations for amazing fare motivates me to look for excellent dining on road trips. Because of my research, I have a list of favorite restaurants. However, none of these culinary institutions matches the quality or flavor of my all-time preferred place to eat, Grandma Lottie’s kitchen.

Train Travel

Jun 10, 2015
www.usnavyseabeemuseum.org

This week we'll leave the garden and hop a train to the west to celebrate last year's Father's Day at the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum on the coast of Southern California.  My trip was the result of finding a final resting place for my Dad's World War II memorabilia, and then transporting the precious cargo on the same route the G.I.s took 70 years ago, when they fought the war in the Pacific. 

No Place for Sissies

Jun 1, 2015

We invited a French exchange student to share our lives for six weeks one summer. Her first question after she deposited her luggage in the bedroom was, “Do you have tornadoes here?”

Morning Edition featured a story that reminds us to take a moment to remember what this day is about. If you missed it, follow the link.

What is this three day weekend all about? What are the traditions of Memorial Day? Take the quiz from the Washington Post and find out how much you know about a holiday many will say marks the beginning of summer.

solarlivinginterns.blogspot.com

It is that time when Kansas cars, driveways, and tops of heads wear purplish reminders of a passing bird’s mulberry feast. Everyone saw it coming as pale fruits of this native tree first turned from white to bright red then matured to black-purple. Not so long ago, Jayhawk-state residents looked forward to this early spring fruit as one of summer’s first harvests. Now days, most folks consider these berries a mess to clean up.

  HPPR is so pleased to present Terri Hendrix and Lloyd Maines in a Living Room Concert  on Friday, June 5! This show will be at The Fibonacci, located at 3306 SW 6th Ave, the home of Chamber Music Amarillo.  The doors will open at 7:00, and the show will start at 7:30.  We are asking for a suggested donation of $15.00 for this show.  To make a reservation, call us at 806-367-9088 or send an e-mail to music@hppr.org.  Don't miss this one!

About Terri Hendrix(from terri's website terrihendrix.com)

This Lamar Town

May 21, 2015
Russ Baldwin / The Prowers Journal

Pick a highway.. any highway… here on the high plains… as you pass through small towns there are skeletons standing on main street, reminding you of another time, when the bare buildings were bustling business, the quiet streets were full of cars, there wasn’t a parking place to be found, and the sidewalks were brimming with people. 

One Lamar, Colorado resident shares a poem of longing for those days and hoping they return.  

pphm.org

American artist George Catlin (1796–1872) journeyed west five times in the 1830s, traversing the Great Plains where he visited and painted more than 140 American Indian tribes. The exhibition “George Catlin’s American Buffalo” presents 40 original Catlin paintings from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection to show the crucial role of the buffalo in Plains Indian culture. Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum will host the Smithsonian American Art Museum Touring Exhibition “George Catlin’s American Buffalo” May 30- Aug 30, 2015 in the Foran Family Galleries.

The Gourd People

May 20, 2015
Skip Mancini

A trip to the San Francisco Flower and Garden Show brought me face to face with a family of gourds that were watching me as I was watching them.  This whimsical art form has been mastered by a garden artist named Betty Finch, and she does wonderful things with gourds big and small.  Don't miss the slide show!

Here's a link to Betty's website: finchgourd.com  

If you’re a fan of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys, The Oklahoma Historical Society just released a compilation of rediscovered songs from the personal transcriptions of Bob Wills. The original recordings were included in the Wills Family donation of Bob Will’s personal items. About 130 recordings of radio broadcast from the 1940s were discovered in the collection. The audio was deteriorating because they were only meant to be played a limited number of times. The work was restored and remastered. The initial run is 1,000 records pressed on 180-gram vinyl. The album features songs once thought lost to time, dust, heat and mold from one of Oklahoma’s biggest musical icons. The effort is part of OHS’s effort to tell more Oklahoma history through music, film, radio, television, literature, theater, and more.

The second to last Saturday in May people who were held at Camp Amache journey to the detention center in southeastern Colorado. The come to share what they remember about their time behind the barbed wire. Previously, busloads of former detainees have attended. This year there were only two who could make the trek- Bob Fuchagami, age 85, and Jane Okubo who was born at the camp. Fuchagami was 12 years old when his family of 10, were taken from their walnut and peach tree farm outside Yuba City, California to take up residence in two rooms in 7G. He says it wasn’t freedom to be swept up and have two suitcases of stuff, go to an area you’ve never known before with sandstorms coming through the cracks. There’s almost nothing left of the camp. A handful of buildings, shattered porcelain, exposed rebar, concrete slabs, an occasional ribbon of barbed wire, and very few survivors. Survivors say as they age and their peers die, their experiences are falling deeper and deeper into the footnotes of history.

icancookthat.org

Cindee called me asking how to use up the frozen venison in her freezer.  I had a solution she hadn't thought of.  As a matter of fact, I made some BBQ venison in my smoker over the weekend, and here's how I cook it.

HPPR's Songwriters in the Round series continues on Friday, May 15!  This show will be at The Fibonacci, located at 3306 SW 6th Ave, the home base of Chamber Music Amarillo.  The doors will open at 7:00, and the show will start at 7:30.  To make a reservation for this show, give us a call at 806-367-9088 or send an e-mail to music@hppr.org.  We will have the usual great coffee from the good folks at Evocation Coffee Roasters, cookies from Kristy Fuller and a great evening of original music.  Don't miss it!

About the Artists

Rick Branigan

peeksintojoyce.blogspot.com

 Remember the childhood story about the country mouse and the city mouse? I loved to read that book as a little girl. Why it appealed to me, I don’t know. However, since late this summer my daughters and I have had the opportunity see observe the differences between country cats and town cats.

Survey says…. most Kansas voters believe it’s wrong to discriminate against gay and transgender people, but they also value religious faith.  A recent survey by the Docking Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University reveals Kansans also reject attempts by some to push their beliefs onto others.

According to a press release from FHSU:

Dr. Chapman Rackaway, a Docking Fellow and an FHSU professor of political science, found that Kansans are largely divided on support for gay marriage, civil unions or neither.

Kudos for Pluto

Apr 10, 2015
Kansas Public Radio

Pluto has taken on new prominence this year in the northern Arizona city where it was discovered.  Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff has dedicated 2015 to celebrating one of its most popular attractions and the amateur astronomer who spotted it 85 years ago. 

There's a little place in the Texas Panhandle that was just named one of the 17 Texas barbecue joints you need to try before you die- Mike's BBQ Haven in Amarillo.

  We here at HPPR love having guests in our studios.  This morning Maxwell Hughes and Edison stopped by to talk about their show tonight in Amarillo, and to play a couple of tunes for us. They are slowly working their way back home to Colorado after SXSW; you can catch them tonight-4/1 at the 806 Coffeehouse at 2812 SW 6th Ave in Amarillo.  There is no cover charge and the show starts at 9pm.  Listen to the entire interview below.

When you think of Bonnie and Clyde, does southwestern Kansas ever cross your mind? The couple actually lived in Hugoton for several months using the aliases of Blackie and Jewell Underwood reports Kathy Hanks for the Hutchinson News. The two came to town in an old Model A drawn to the area because of the flourishing gas industry. Hugoton was a mecca in a time when the rest of the country was in the depths of the Great Depression.

Jay Ricci / amarillo.com

Have you noticed the two cement towers a few miles east of Amarillo and ever wondered… what in the world? 

The pair are remaining sentinels of the Amarillo Air Force Base writes Jay Ricci for the Amarillo Globe News. 

The military men and women and most of the buildings are gone.  What remains are rusted-out pieces of metal, sidewalks leading nowhere, lonely street signs at intersections with no traffic, and the two rusty water towers.

Attendees might have come to the 13th annual High Plains Snow Goose Festival expecting good food, music, and a chance to see thousands of migrating Canadian and Snow geese, but this year they got even more: a dust storm complete with tumbleweeds; snow cancellations; encounters with elk, road runners, big horn sheep; and petroglyphs in Picture and Carrizo Canyons.

All my married life, I’ve loved attending local auctions.  Part of the charm of these gatherings is seeing friends and neighbors and catching up with one another’s busy lives or listening to the auctioneer’s clever patter.  Another reason these events draw me  is the chance to see history and sometimes buy a little chunk of someone else’s story.  Unfortunately, there comes a time when those little pieces of other’s lives add up to enough stuff to clutter my closets to overflowing.  Before anything bursts, I need to take action.

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