HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Billy Hathorn / Wikimedia Commons

A statue of Quanah Parker, the legendary Comanche chief, has been dedicated in Snyder, Texas, reports The Abilene Reporter-News.

The bronze statue was crafted by Abilene sculptor Terry Gilbreth, and it shows Parker looking out over the open prairie with a spear in his hand. The statue stands in front of the Scurry County Museum on the campus of Western Texas College. From the tip of the spear, the statue stands almost 20 feet high.

glo.texas.gov

An artifact from the birth of Texas has made its way back into official hands after 173 years.

As The Austin Chronicle reports, a map of the Republic of Texas that was purchased by a Kerrville couple at a Dallas liquidation sale has been handed over to Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.

The map depicts Texas in 1844, one year before the independent nation was granted statehood.

Public Domain

The Pumpkin
By John Greenleaf Whittier
 

Oh, greenly and fair in the lands of the sun,
The vines of the gourd and the rich melon run,
And the rock and the tree and the cottage enfold,
With broad leaves all greenness and blossoms all gold,
Like that which o'er Nineveh's prophet once grew,
While he waited to know that his warning was true,
And longed for the storm-cloud, and listened in vain
For the rush of the whirlwind and red fire-rain.

Public Domain

Many Americans were taught in school that the tradition of Thanksgiving dates back to the pilgrims.

But, as The New York Times reports, the story most of us learned about the first Thanksgiving isn’t exactly accurate. In 1621 Pilgrims in Plymouth, MA, did indeed host a three-day feast that was attended by Wampanoag Indians. But this event wasn’t called “the First Thanksgiving,” until the 1830s. Abraham Lincoln finally made the holiday official in 1863 to celebrate Union Army victories.

Each week, Valerie Brown-Kuchera will bring us Little Spouse on the Prairie, the show where she pokes affectionate fun at her husband, her kids, her home and her rural life, even though she loves them all fiercely.

Albert Herring / Wikimedia Commons

Legendary country and western singer-songwriter Mel Tillis died this week; Tillis was a longtime friend and supporter of the High Plains region.

Tillis was famous for his mellifluous singing voice and his stutter when he spoke. Tillis’s self-effacing nature was in evidence when he purchased a country radio station in Amarillo and used the call letters KMML, a winking reference to his own speech impediment.

Tia McGraff & Tommy Parham—TWO SHOWS!

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FIRST SHOW: Thursday, November 30
Satanta Senior Center (118 Sequoyah St.) -- Show @ 7p

RSVP for Satanta online here, or call 806.367.9088 to be added to the list!

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SECOND SHOW: Friday, December 1

Thanks so much to a trio of Nashville darlings, Szlachetka & Granville Automatic, for stopping by High Plains Morning today!

Find out more about their music and forthcoming albums by clicking on their names.

And if you're in the Amarillo area, go see them at Bar Z Winery tonight (11/16/17) in Canyon, TX.  If you missed their interview and live, in-studio performance, click the link below.   

Join us for Geography Awareness Week celebration on Silver Rails.  We have National Geographic Maps for your correctly answered questions.

The grand prize winner of geography awareness week will get this lovely globe bookend with the cancer is walnut base built by Jeff Horlacher of Horlacher jewelers in Colby Kansas

It's Geography Awareness Week, and we're celebrating it on Silver Rails: Music of the World in the Folk Traditions.

Radio Readers BookByte: Tsil Cafe & New World Foods

Nov 10, 2017
Tom Averill / Topeka, Kansas

I’m Tom Averill, author of the culinary novel Secrets of the Tsil Café, and a “foodie” in my kitchen and in my library. My book, published in 2001, came from years of research, starting in 1992, the 500th anniversary of the Columbus voyage.  I wasn’t on the Columbus bandwagon, given the European decimation of the New World:  the killing and enslavement of people, the pilfering of gold and silver, the outlawing of languages and religions, even the environmental damage done. 

Radio Readers BookByte: Edible Stories? Not so Much

Nov 8, 2017
Free Republic

What is edible about this book, Edible Stories: a novel in 16 parts?

Not much, really. A far cry from the Kurlansky selection we read in August, there are no recipes, no community stories… The most mouthwatering descriptions are of Orangina and caviar… Things already prepared for us, and placed on a shelf in a store for us to pick up.

We start this book with a lie. A man decides to lie rather than be embarrassed for a single moment… He pretends his entire life to everyone he sees and knows. It makes them wary of him; they stop trusting him. The people around him—his wife, his secretary, his boss and colleagues—they grow tired of his false front. They can’t connect to this persona.

Radio Readers BookByte: Control the Food - Control the Culture

Nov 6, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

There’s a certain possessiveness with art, even if we did not create it ourselves.  People love to be the “discoverer” of greatness.  I have this possessiveness toward books.  When I read an incredibly powerful book, I am torn between my desire to share the greatness with others so that we may talk and revel in the wonder of it together, and my desire to keep it to myself.  A part of me wants to own it and hoard it.  I realize this is completely irrational. 

My Plates press release

Seventeen years ago, at the dawn of the new millennium, the State of Texas scrapped its traditional white license plates for a more graphics-heavy design.

The 2000 plate, with its cowboy and space shuttle and oil derricks and moon and stars, gained popularity among some but was lambasted by others who saw the design as an unfortunate departure from the clean design of the past.

If you fall into the first group, then you have cause to rejoice this month as the state has announced that independent contractor My Plates is bringing back the millennial design.

Radio Readers BookByte: Memama's Sweet Roll Dough

Nov 3, 2017
Lynne Hewes / Cimarron, KS

Every year at Thanksgiving, I spend quality time with my grandmother, a wonderful woman who died about 40 years ago.  Together, early each Thanksgiving morning, she and I pour a cup of coffee, dig out a handwritten recipe card, peel, cut up, and boil one large potato, and set about creating “Memama’s sweet roll dough.”

Radio Readers BookByte: Food and Common Ground

Nov 1, 2017
Jason Harper / Ft. Hays State University

Today my focus is on Mark Kurlansky's Edible Stories, and how food is one of the many bonds that people find as common ground.

This common ground through food is true in fact, fiction -- and in teaching. Years ago, beginning in 2006, I taught college composition courses in a partnership program between Pittsburg State University and a university in Asunción, Paraguay. Then, a year later, I was teaching for partnership between Fort Hays State University and a university in China. 

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

The Gibbonses - Live in Concert!

Friday, November 10

The Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP online here or call 806.367.9088 so we can add you to the list!

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Thanks so much to the cast of The Rocky Horror Show from RnR Entertainment for stopping by the High Plains Morning studio today! We had a blast hearing about the production, and thanks for giving us a live, in-studio performance. 

For more information about the show and the troupe, read this great article from Chip Chandler at Panhandle PBS. 

Radio Readers BookByte: Name that Character

Oct 30, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Welcome to the Radio Readers book club and the 2017 Fall Read.  We’ve been discussing our second Mark Kurlansky selection. 

Earlier in my chats about Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts, I promised I would touch upon Kurlansky’s use of names.  While I don’t believe that Kurlansky chose every single name in the book for symbolic reasons, I do think paid close attention to this task.

Radio Readers BookByte: Belons and Oysters

Oct 27, 2017
Kansapedia / Kansas State History Society

Hello Radio Readers!  Dana Waters from Fowler, Kansas, here.  When I read Mark Kurlansky’s Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts, I found the oysters in the story titled “Belons” especially intriguing.  Wouldn’t it be fun to compare the Belons to the Portugaises, paired with a bottle of Sancerre of course?  I’m thinking a small Paris café, since Belons are probably not a High Plains specialty, right? 

Radio Readers BookByte: City Food

Oct 25, 2017

Mark Kurlansky’s Edible Stories is an odd collection of strange characters and strange experiences. People fall into holes and go to baseball games and watch the stock market at the gym and argue with their neighbors. Throughout these braided stories of characters that criss cross one another is the food—pink salt, fattening muffins, wine—that punctuate misunderstandings and hurt feelings. It’s a book about people, mostly.

And yet the stories are about food. Food, really, in cities.

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

The War & Treaty - Live in Concert!

Saturday, October 28 

Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave., Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP NOW online, or call 806.367.9088 so we can add you to the list!

Radio Readers BookByte: Win Friends & Influence People

Oct 23, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Welcome to the Radio Readers Book Club, where we are wrapping up our Fall Read with discussion of Mark Kurlansky’s Edible Stories.  I’m Valerie Brown-Kuchera, your discussion leader for this title, coming to you from Quinter to delve into the idea that people who snack together, pack together. 

·        High Plains Public Radio sponsors live music concerts across the High Plains. Most shows are scheduled for venues in the Amarillo, TX area or at HPPR’s studio in Garden City, KS—but we are always looking for hosts in towns across our listening region. We primarily book shows for Friday or Saturday nights, as those nights draw a bigger crowd.

Tonight in Amarillo, don't miss The RandyBoys, live at Fireslice Pizzaria (34th & Coulter) as they KICK OFF their 2017 HPPR Music Ambassador Tour of our listening region. For full details, locations, and dates, visit their website! But just so it's easy, there's a visual rundown below.

THINGS TO KNOW: 

-No RSVPs are necessary. Seating is first-come-first-seated. 

The Gary L. Nall Lecture Series in Western Studies presents Brian DeLay: “The Texas Gun Frontier & the Travails of Mexican History.” 

Don't miss my interview with co-founder and drummer for Kansas, Phil Ehart. We talk about touring, keeping a the music fresh after 40+ years, and he attempts to answer a question I've had for years: "What the heck IS 'prog rock?'" [Spoiler alert: He's not quite sure.]

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series presents:

Renfree Isaacs - Live in Concert!

Saturday, October 21st

The Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

RSVP ONLINE NOW! or call 806.367.9088.

***This show is sponsored by Evocation Coffee & Chamber Music Amarillo.****

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to announce the The RandyBoys—Music Ambassador Tour 2017. They'll be bringing HPPR's Living Room Concerts to 18 communities across the High Plains, including the Texas & Oklahoma Panhandles, Western Kansas, and Eastern Colorado. From October 17 thru Nov 9th, Randy and Randy will be cruising across our listening area. Click here to find out if they're coming to YOUR town! 

On September 22nd, High Plains Public Radio headed over to Albuquerque, NM for one of the most inspirational music festivals in the US: ¡Globalquerque! This world music collective brings together global artists in a way no other festival does, with inspirational, soul-lifting performances. It takes place each year at the National Hispanic Cultural Center—an incredible space for a truly unique festival. Performances take place across three stages: the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theater, & dance outside on the Plaza Mayor. You can learn more about the Global Fiesta free Saturday daytime programming and the Global Village of Crafts, Culture and Cuisine.

Today's edition of Growing on the High Plains asks you to hearken to our High Plains history as we ponder the lot of early pioneers, especially what harvest time meant to them. 

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