HPPR Health, Education & Welfare

Health

‐state policy‐impact of federal policy‐rural health care delivery‐access & availability

Education

‐state policy‐programs and opportunities‐access & availability

Welfare

‐state policies‐income levels‐wellness‐quality of life

Doctor Shopping

Apr 2, 2015
Oklahoma Governor's Office

Oklahoma now requires doctors to check a new prescription drug database before prescribing certain addictive drugs. This is based on a new bill passed by the Oklahoma senate on Tuesday. The bill was later signed by Governor Mary Fallin, as the first bill of this legislative session. 

Child poverty in Colorado

Apr 1, 2015
Colorado Public Radio / Colorado Public Radio

  Child poverty is a major concern in Colorado, officials are contending with the issue by addressing teen pregnancies, food stamp use, and much more. In a report published last month government leaders can see the wide variety of concerns and take measures to alleviate the problem.

Some farmers warming to the Affordable Care Act

Mar 26, 2015

Farmers and ranchers have had a little more than a year to adjust to the Affordable Care Act. Some chafe against the requirement to buy health insurance, but others are starting to appreciate parts of the new law.

In a somewhat surprising move, the chairman of the state House Public Education committee says lawmakers will try to tackle the state’s school finance system this legislative session. That’s even while they await a ruling from the state Supreme Court on whether the finance system is constitutional.

You've seen the headlines, there are some things you need to keep in mind when it comes to Roundup.

Dave Ranney / Kansas Health Institute

State officials told legislators Thursday that the state's share of Medicaid expansion costs could start at $100 million per year and increase from there, and those costs could double if the federal government required full funding of waiting lists as a condition of expansion.

One day after her predecessor testified in favor of expansion under the Affordable Care Act, Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Susan Mosier provided neutral testimony that warned legislators of potential fiscal pitfalls.

Mosier said there were "moral implications" of expanding Medicaid to "able-bodied adults" while Kansans with disabilities were still awaiting some services, likening it to "cutting in line."

Texas Lawmakers Consider Parent Trigger Schools Law

Mar 20, 2015

Texas lawmakers are considering a policy known as a “parent trigger” law. The goal of the legislation is to prompt parent involvement and quicken turnarounds at struggling schools reports the Texas Tribune. The bill allows parents of students at underperforming public schools to campaign for school changes. That includes hiring new staff, contracting with a charter school operator to take over management, or closing the school altogether.

A special enrollment period for health insurance through the federal marketplace started Sunday. But, not everyone's eligible.

Three Kansans have died from an outbreak of listeriosis. The patients had been hospitalized for unrelated causes and the CDC says four of them consumed milkshakes made with a single-serving of Blue Bell Creameries' ice cream product called "Scoops."

cpr.org

For the first time in more than a decade enrollment in the federal food stamp program fell in Colorado reports Colorado Public Radio.  The rate dropped to 8.6 percent in 2013 according to data released from the U.S. Census Bureau.  The previous year close to 10 percent of Coloradoans received food stamps.

Colorado enrollment rates increased sharply during the recession. 

Only 3.3 percent were enrolled in 2000.  

Kansas has the highest rate of students starting at a two-year public institution and finishing with a degree from a four-year college or university. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center's annual report lists only five states above 20 percent. They are: Kansas, Texas, Iowa, North Dakota, and Virginia.

According to the Kansas Insurance Department, members of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas and other Blue organizations were also affected by the security breach.

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