HPPR People & Communities

People

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Communities

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StateImpact Oklahoma

There are a handful of people still around who remember the darkness that feel over Oklahoma 80 years ago. Black Sunday was commemorated at the Oklahoma Capitol by Dust Bowl Survivors recently.

Survivor Pauline Hodges, who was only 5 at the time, recounts the onset of the storm at the Capitol, “It looked like night. There was so much dirt in the air and that made it so black.”

Amber Waves of Change: Homecoming (Part 4)

Apr 7, 2015
Photo by David Guth

What is it that keeps a community afloat in the face of dramatic population decline? In his final chapter on the concerns in rural America, University of Kansas Journalism Professor David Guth reveals that family ties and aggressive community planning keep the High Plains populous.  From Kansas Public Radio,  see how communities are managing to hold their own. 

Amber Waves of Change: Rural Newspapers (Part 3)

Apr 7, 2015
(Photo by David Guth) / Kansas Public Radio

The struggle to survive for small town local media is in direct correlation to the dwindling population.

In the third installment of the four part series on issues facing rural America, from Kansas Public Radio, Professor David Guth addresses the apparent, imminent demise of rural newspapers. As well as what challenges rural publishers are facing, where the decline of subscribers and advertisers is equal to a slow march towards demise.   

Big Texas

Mar 30, 2015
KUT.org / KUT.org

It would appear that the old adage "Everything is bigger in Texas" can now be applied to the Lone Star State itself. From NPR affiliate KUT of Austin Texas, Reporter Laura Rice, "Texas has gotten used to topping lists about booming business and population growth."

Data collected from the 2013-14 census indicates rapid growth across the state. "In a lot of cases, Texas leads a lot of the growth area statistics primarily because Texas itself is very, very large." U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates Branch Chief Ben Bolender.

Brown Creeper Therapy

Mar 19, 2015

The months after Christmas until mid-to late March are the most difficult of the year in my opinion.  Spring and summer have always warmed my heart as well as my back as I bend over tomato plants in the garden or flowers in their beds. Over time, I have learned to love fall with all its color and pre-cold weather symphonies even though I know what comes next.  But winter—I struggle with.  It takes effort to celebrate long, colorless days.

washingtonpost.com

The population in the United States is rapidly growing.  It’s expected to expand by 49 million people by 2030 reports the Washington Post.

More people along with Baby Boomers retiring will dramatically alter the age demographics of many communities, leaving some with larger burdens of social services and fewer workers to help fund them. 

Plains, Kansas is plugging away at addressing an issue facing many small towns on the High Plains – the lack of a grocery store. So far, about $400,000 in funding has been secured through tax credits, grants, donations and fund-raisers. That’s towards a total estimated cost of roughly 1.4 million dollars to buy land, build the new structure, and equip, stock and staff the store. The project is featured in this a recent New York Times article. While recognizing the determined efforts of community residents, it poses the question of whether the local grocery, if successfully built, will be able to overcome the “Walmart” effect. (Plains is located 25 miles northeast of Liberal, where there’s a Walmart, Dillons grocery and Asian, Mexican and natural food markets.)

Rhonda's Secret Hot Chocolate

Dec 24, 2014
Kathleen Holt

If you were unable to join friends of High Plains Public Radio for Amarillo’s Parade of Lights this month, you can enjoy a bit of the fun by making Rhonda’s secret hot chocolate mix.

HPPR board members, volunteers and staff enjoyed a studio open house against the background of music provided by Amy and Greg, then served hot chocolate during Center City’s annual parade. 

Texas Underwriting Representative, Rhonda Dittfurth arranged for donations allowing HPPR to distribute hot chocolate to more than 300 parade goers.

getruralkansas.com

Lovers of sun light, rejoice. Soon, the winter solstice will pass for another year. Even though days grow longer only a few minutes at a time, we’ll soon enjoy more sunshine than darkness in a 24-hour span. Unfortunately, it takes a month or so of incremental minutes before longer days are noticeable, so until then let’s bask in the glow of Christmas lights.

A ballot initiative being promoted by a Lakewood, Colorado couple to keep the state permanently on Mountain Daylight Time could make time keeping tricky for those crossing through four Kansas counties on the Colorado border. 

Sonja Salzburg for Harvest Public Media

Many beer aficionados are familiar with the rare breweries run by Trappist monks. The beer is highly sought after, but it’s not the only food or drink made by a religious order. Many abbeys and convents have deep roots in agriculture, combining farm work with prayer.

amarillo.com/

Half a century ago, Tony and Claudia Price were two 18 year old kids on their honeymoon in Oklahoma City.  The Texas pair returned home with priceless story that went viral—the old fashioned way according to the Amarillo Globe News

KU Medical Center recruiting the next generation of rural health workers

Nov 27, 2014
Andy Marso /KHI News Service

In the last two years Seth Nutt has traveled to nearly every corner of Kansas, introducing rural students to health care professionals.

Grassroots Art Center

Many small towns have welcome signs that proclaim their state athletic championships from years gone by.  But Lucas, Kansas will now be able to welcome visitors with a sign stating, “Welcome to Lucas, home of the No. 2 restroom in the country -2014”.

The Prowers Journal

There’s good news for veterans in southeastern Colorado.  The VA Medical Clinic now has a permanent location Lamar reported the Prowers Journal.  When the Prowers Medial Clinic closed over a year and a half ago, a mobile trailer was brought in as a stop-gap measure. 

The size of the unauthorized immigrant population in Colorado and Kansas fell between 2009 and 2012 and stayed the same in Texas and Oklahoma, according to an updated tracking report from the Pew Center for Research. 

Gloria Tucker / Dodge City Daily Globe

Mary Springs knows the secret to living a long life. She says it's blueberries and beer reported the Dodge City Daily Globe.

Here's a short interview with Lindsay London, the rally coordinator for the Amarillo event taking place on Saturday, September 6 in Medi-Park.

friendsoffogelberg.com

 Buddy Squyres is Mike's guest this morning on High Plains Morning.  They're talking about the upcoming Friends of Fogelberg concert.

This year's show is a tribute to the Beatles and prostate cancer survivors.

Squyres is a survivor.  He encourages all men over the age of 50 to be screened.  

All proceeds from the concert stay in the Panhandle to fund the fight against prostate cancer.

A free screening is planned for this Saturday, at the Westgate Mall from 10 am to 2 pm.

akronnewsreporter.com

Rodney Meade was inducted into the Colorado County Music Hall of Fame this weekend in Boulder according to the Akron News-Reporter.

Skip Delivers Bountiful Garden Basket

Aug 13, 2014

Each spring Skip Mancini, host of Growing on the High Plains, stops by HPPR's studio to help-out during the station's on-air membership campaign. While at the studio, she also holds a drawing, in which she'll  take off across the High Plains to hand-deliver one lucky listener a giant basket full of her garden's summer harvest. 

Courtesy Emily Robbins

Emily Robbins is a city girl now.

Well, I’m using that term as a cliché. Robbins, 27, lives in Kansas City and works as an engineer at a large firm. She is part of a profession that is made up of just 14 percent women.

Her choice of professions makes sense, though, when you know that she started out as her father’s “boy.”

The Texas Panhandle bids farewell to a quiet man, Henry Carroll LaMaster. A quiet man, who came from a pioneering family of humble service and education that did two things no other family in the Panhandle accomplished.

Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

As a young man, Elisha Pullen never imagined he would spend his days on the farm.

Growing up near rural Bell City in southeastern Missouri’s “Bootheel” region, Pullen longed to leave the farm and get an education.

“I grew up in the day and time when we had to do a lot of chopping and stuff like that. Hard labor,” Pullen said. “I’m going to college, I’m getting my degree and I’m going to work in the air conditioning.”

commons.wikimedia.org

Communication is heartbreaking for families who have a loved one with Alzheimer’s.  A new music therapy project in Central and Western Kansas experienced a bit of a breakthrough reported KMUW.

national.deseretnews.com

Between 2012 and 2013, 11.7 percent of the population moved according to the U.S. Census Bureau.  About a third of those moved because of “family-related reasons,” the Wall Street Journal reported.

Brett Ryder / economist.com

Koch Industries is one of the great success stories of American business.  The oil, gas and commodities conglomerate is based in Wichita.  It employs more than 100,000 people worldwide and has an annual turnover of about $115 billion.  It’s also one of the most unusual companies in its management techniques, enthusiasm for political activism, as well as the intensity of its family feuds according to a recent article in the Economist about a new book, “Sons of Wichita,” by Daniel Schulman.

bostonherald.com

Angelo McClain is a social worker.  He never planned on it, but that’s where the road led. 

dodgeglobe.com

Vanessa Melendez was six years old when she arrived in the United States.  She doesn’t remember much about her life before in Mexico.  The Dodge City resident does remember being a teenager and discovering she was in the U.S. illegally when she applied for her first job according to a recent article from the Dodge City Daily Globe.

wtamu.edu

James Welch didn’t plan his career.  He just worked hard and did the next thing according to an article from West Texas A&M University.

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