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This month, nearly 21,000 students in Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa celebrated National Farm-to School-Month by crunching into locally grown apples at school, reports The Center for Rural Affairs.

The event was part of an effort to draw attention to Farm-to-School programs, in which school cafeterias serve food to students that is sourced from regional farms and ranches.

James M. Dobson / Garden City Telegram

“Garden City is small and peaceful,” Halima Farah, 26, told USA TODAY this week. “I love living here. I didn't think something like that could happen here.”

Farah lives in the apartment complex that was targeted for a mass bombing this weekend by a violent white-nationalist militia group. The men had evidently hoped to spur similar such acts of violence across the nation. But their foiled plan is having the opposite effect.

Bryan Bihorel

On Sunday afternoon, a group of citizens in Garden City, KS gathered at the apartment complex that was at the center of a thwarted terrorist plot by three members of a Kansas militia group to attack Muslim immigrants and refugees.

StacieScott / The Gazette

A new submarine will head to sea next year, with a taste of the Centennial State on board.

The Colorado Springs Gazette reports that cooks aboard the brand-new USS Colorado have been studying the cuisine of the state that is the submarine’s namesake. Some of Colorado’s top chefs recently met with the kitchen staff of the underwater vessel.

Canyon Area Library  brought in some High Plains wanna-be podcasters and WOW -- we were all amazed by what these gifted storytellers pulled together in less than an hour!

Thank you so much to our participants, our organizers, and all the parents. (Your kids are GREAT!) The spontaneous creativity knocked our socks off. From the studio to the airwaves, see below for the final cuts.

David Woo / Dallas Morning News

We hear a lot of stories about how Texas shapes the wider world. From oil policy to cowboy lore, the Lone Star State has an outsized impact on planet earth. But last week The New York Times published an editorial on how the shape of Texas shapes the conversation about Texas.


A Ulysses, Kansas, teen has been carrying a pretty impressive load, reports KSN.com.

Courtesy Photo / kansas.com

A legendary Garden City, Kansas, newsman died this month. The Wichita Eagle Wilbur Eugene “Bill” Brown “the consummate journalist – elegant and always to the point.” Brown, the Eagle added, “loved accuracy and good writing and freely admitted to a dislike of Truman Capote.”

Rural Blog

When rural areas adopt broadband networks, it leads to higher levels of voting and civic engagement.

That’s according to a new a new study by Oklahoma State University. The study found that, as rates of rural broadband adoption increase, so do other civic factors. These include rates of voting in local elections, contacting local public officials, joining a neighborhood group and discussing politics with friends or family.

Kansas City Star

Earlier this month, racist messages were written on the sidewalks of a college in a small Kansas town, reports The Kansas City Star.

Creative Commons

Exactly how flat is Kansas?

As Atlas Obscura reports, Kansas geographer Jerry Dobson has been dogged his whole career by that very question. Finally, a few years ago, he and fellow Kansas geographer Joshua Campbell undertook to measure the flatness of every state in the union.

Michael Schumacher / Amarillo Globe-News

An Amarillo man who made headlines last month for his creative way of helping others is at it again.

Last month Kit Rudd gained statewide attention for living among the homeless in Amarillo to call attention to their plight. And now Rudd has announced that, later this month, he plans to ride the 300 miles to Dallas on horseback.

RJ Sangosti / The Denver Post

Autumn is just around the corner and the Denver Post has published a list of perfect drives for seeing Colorado’s beautiful fall colors. Rocky Mountain State Park provides an added bonus in addition to its breathtaking leaves. Elk herds can be seen congregating in the meadows during the fall, with bulls emitting their high-pitched bugle call.

Metrocosm / Washington Post

Immigration has been a hot-button issue throughout the 2016 presidential race. But, according to surveys, Americans actually know very little about the issue.

The Washington Post recently noted that it was “remarkable just how much Americans overestimate immigration in their country.” On average, Americans guessed that one-third of people in the U.S. are immigrants. That’s more than double the actual figure.

Center for Rural Affairs

Tyler Vacha grew up on a farm in Nebraska, and he learned a lot of valuable lessons there. In a recent essay for the Center for Rural Affairs, Tyler wondered if the important lessons he picked up would be foreign to children of the twenty-first century.

Tyler wrote that he’s recently become aware that he’d taken his experiences on the farm for granted. How, he wondered, will he teach his kids to be responsible without asking them to feed and water livestock?

Morning Consult

Rural residents still aren’t using the internet as much as their urban counterparts, according to a new study.

Alex Livesey / Getty Images

Texas athletes fared remarkably well during the first week of the Olympics, reports Texas Monthly. During the first seven days in Rio, Texans took home thirteen medals, eight of which were golds. As a matter of fact, a full one third of the United States’ medal count has been won by Texan athletes.

I just received this incredible thank-you card from Sarai, my new buddy at the Canyon Public Library. She came in to drop off her registration for our Chase the Sunset event in the Palo Duro Canyon, and I got her to record a station ID for High Plains Morning. Thank you, Sarai! You'll never understand how VERY happy this makes a morning DJ!


The Gazette

Colorado and Kansas are two of the most welcoming states toward refugees, according to a new study.

Researchers from the International Rescue Committee combed through tweets from all 50 states looking for positive and negative language regarding refugees. Colorado ranks eighth for having the most positive tweets regarding newcomers fleeing terror and hardship, reports The Gazette. Kansas performed even better, landing at fourth on the list.


The Center for Rural Affairs is celebrating the “Dog Days” of summer with a canine-focused fundraiser. Send a photo of your pup to info@cfra.org, and the Center will feature the picture on their website and social media. The CFRA is hoping to raise $10,000 by the end of August.

Peter Thody / roadtripamerica.com

Most travelers passing through Groom, Texas, are distracted by the almost-200-foot-high cross that towers over the little town. But the lucky few who happen to glance north of the interstate are met with a surprise. In Groom you’ll find what Slate’s Atlas Obscura blog calls “The Leaning Tower of Texas.”

This small town just east of Amarillo on old Route 66 contains a water tower that looks to be the victim of an earthquake. The structure leans at a crazy angle, two of its legs dangling off the ground.

Check out Amarillo-based News Channel 10's coverage of HPPR's projected expansion, 94.9 FM Connect. Thanks to John Kanelis for this story. 

We're excited to explore this next chapter in our station's future!

Terry Jeanson / Texas Escapes

Immigration in Texas doesn’t seem to be slowing, notes The LA Times. Almost 45,000 immigrants have crossed the border since October, most from Central America. The small Texas town of Alice has found itself reeling after the oil bust, and the influx of immigrants hasn’t helped the town’s fortunes. But now a British correctional company has offered itself up as an “unexpected savior.”

Lauren Koski / amarillo.com

Wills Elementary in Amarillo has been harvesting produce alongside the brick buildings of the school. And now those fruits and vegetables are going to a good cause, reports Amarillo.com. The food will help refugee and low-income families feed their families. The program is part of a partnership with the High Plains Food Bank.

Nick Cote / New York Times

The West has changed a great deal since the days of thousand-mile cattle drives. Ranchers now employ drones to track livestock, and many have traded in their trusty horses for four-wheelers. But in Colorado and other parts of the High Plains, notes The New York Times, there’s one tradition that hasn’t changed: branding day.

Getty Images

Trivia wiz and 74-time Jeopardy! champ Ken Jennings recently reported on strange phenomena on a Kansas farm for Condé Nast Traveler. The 360-acre farm of Joyce Taylor, just north of Potwin, is a quiet place off the beaten path. But a few years ago Taylor, 82, began receiving strange phone calls and visitors.


Ever dream of owning a ghost town? Now’s your chance!

The deserted town of Cabin Creek, Colorado, in rural Adams County, is now available for purchase on Craigslist, reports KDVR. “We've had so many people look it`s been amazing,” said the current owner of the town, James Johnson. The road-side village along Highway 36 is available for the tidy sum of $350,000. For that price, you’ll get an old service station, a café, an abandoned motel, and a small house.


Surrounded by weeds in a remote section of Webster County, Nebraska, sits an unremarkable clearing. You wouldn’t think it was anything special if you stumbled upon it, notes NTV, but if this pasture could talk it would tell you a secret. There used to be a baseball field here, and a legend pitched from its mound. His name was Denton True Young. But most folks know him as “Cy.”

Brennan Linsley / AP photo

Rural voters have been flocking to the GOP in recent decades, reports governing.com.

This year, there are 15 states where rural residents make up more than half the population. Republicans are governors of 11 of them. And the GOP has a chance to pick up the other four in November.

Chelsea Self / Glenwood Springs Post Independent/AP

Bud Gardner is a fixture in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The grizzled-yet-affable man has worked for the city for the last 23 years. He’s a jack-of-all-trades for the city government, mending potholes and fixing water lines.