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Preparing fried rabbit

Dec 3, 2016
Luke Clayton

Not too long ago, rabbit was a staple fare on the hunter's table but today, big game hunting steals much of the  limelight.

Nevertheless, rabbits are great fun to hunt and when fried tender in a cast iron skillet, make a mighty tasty meal.

StateImpact Oklahoma

Where do people go when they leave Oklahoma?

And when they move to the Sooner State, where do they come from? StateImpact Oklahoma decided to investigate, and you probably won’t be shocked to learn that the state’s large neighbor to the south is the main destination of migrating Oklahomans. But you might be surprised to learn that just as many citizens move from Texas to Oklahoma as go the other way.

RoadArch.com

Kansas! Magazine has released its list of the five best small towns in Kansas, and a couple of western Kansas towns made the cut, including Atwood in far northwestern Kansas. The town, with a population of just over 1,000, features attractions like the Jayhawk Theatre, Hayden Nature Trail and the Rawlins County Museum and Historical Society.

Nearby Norton, Kansas, was also on the list. With a population of almost 3,000, Norton claims the Prairie Dog State Park, They Also Ran Gallery, and the Norton Motor Cross Track.

Tara Henry / Fox 8 Cleveland

This holiday, a story about farmers in Indiana responding to tragedy with compassion and resilience.

Earlier this month Indiana farmer Steve Wollyung experienced an unspeakable loss when his four-year-old daughter died. On top of the heartbreak, there was no way Wollyung was going to harvest his crop in time.

A longtime family friend heard about the tragedy, and asked a couple of local farmers for help.

Mike Gorman / The Wall Street Journal

After the most contentious presidential election in memory, many of us are just hoping to get away from the Thanksgiving table without witnessing a murder.

Here, courtesy of The Wall Street Journal, are some tips for surviving Thanksgiving dinner this year.

In the forward to The National Parks: Index 1916-2016, director, Jonathan B. Jarvis writes…

2016 marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service—a defining moment to reflect on and celebrate our accomplishments as we embark on a new century of stewardship and public engagement.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / The Texas Tribune

With Donald Trump’s election, fear is running rampant through communities of undocumented immigrants across the High Plains.

“I think terrified would be the right word,” one Colorado Springs immigration attorney told The Gazette.

During his campaign, Trump vowed to forcibly remove the millions of people in the country illegally.

Center for Rural Strategies

This week The Washington Post’s Wonkblog rolled up its sleeves and got to work trying to figure out why exactly rural voters are so angry. To get a new perspective, the Post talked to Kathy Cramer, author of The Politics of Resentment.

Luke's son Drew Clayton shows off some long range groups he fired using Airforce Airgun's www.airforceairguns.com "Texan"  in .35 caliber. The rifle was pressured to 3,000 psi. and as you can see, even at 100 yards, several "killing" shots were achieved. As pressures drop, the group also drops because of lower velocities. 

Tune in to today's show and learn all about shooting big bore air rifles. Luke gives some tips on shooting and hunting big game with rifles powered by compressed air.

Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post

In the United States, churches and religious organizations are supposed to be above politics. In fact, churches can risk losing their tax-exempt status if they promote individual political candidates.

The Denver Post has published an in-depth examination of how Colorado houses of worship are handling the challenge in this, the most contentious presidential race in decades.

Adam Shrimplin / Reuters

The New York Times has published a full feature on the Somalis living in Garden City, Kansas, who were the focus of a white nationalist bomb plot earlier this month.

The Times noted that towns like Garden City are attractive to immigrants. Pay at many of the cattle yards and packing plants starts at $16 an hour and little English is needed to perform the work there. Many of the Somalis and Burmese, Mexicans and Sudanese who settle here see this as their shot at the American Dream.

cfra.org

This month, nearly 21,000 students in Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa celebrated National Farm-to School-Month by crunching into locally grown apples at school, reports The Center for Rural Affairs.

The event was part of an effort to draw attention to Farm-to-School programs, in which school cafeterias serve food to students that is sourced from regional farms and ranches.

James M. Dobson / Garden City Telegram

“Garden City is small and peaceful,” Halima Farah, 26, told USA TODAY this week. “I love living here. I didn't think something like that could happen here.”

Farah lives in the apartment complex that was targeted for a mass bombing this weekend by a violent white-nationalist militia group. The men had evidently hoped to spur similar such acts of violence across the nation. But their foiled plan is having the opposite effect.

Bryan Bihorel

On Sunday afternoon, a group of citizens in Garden City, KS gathered at the apartment complex that was at the center of a thwarted terrorist plot by three members of a Kansas militia group to attack Muslim immigrants and refugees.

StacieScott / The Gazette

A new submarine will head to sea next year, with a taste of the Centennial State on board.

The Colorado Springs Gazette reports that cooks aboard the brand-new USS Colorado have been studying the cuisine of the state that is the submarine’s namesake. Some of Colorado’s top chefs recently met with the kitchen staff of the underwater vessel.

Canyon Area Library  brought in some High Plains wanna-be podcasters and WOW -- we were all amazed by what these gifted storytellers pulled together in less than an hour!

Thank you so much to our participants, our organizers, and all the parents. (Your kids are GREAT!) The spontaneous creativity knocked our socks off. From the studio to the airwaves, see below for the final cuts.

David Woo / Dallas Morning News

We hear a lot of stories about how Texas shapes the wider world. From oil policy to cowboy lore, the Lone Star State has an outsized impact on planet earth. But last week The New York Times published an editorial on how the shape of Texas shapes the conversation about Texas.

KSN

A Ulysses, Kansas, teen has been carrying a pretty impressive load, reports KSN.com.

Courtesy Photo / kansas.com

A legendary Garden City, Kansas, newsman died this month. The Wichita Eagle Wilbur Eugene “Bill” Brown “the consummate journalist – elegant and always to the point.” Brown, the Eagle added, “loved accuracy and good writing and freely admitted to a dislike of Truman Capote.”

Rural Blog

When rural areas adopt broadband networks, it leads to higher levels of voting and civic engagement.

That’s according to a new a new study by Oklahoma State University. The study found that, as rates of rural broadband adoption increase, so do other civic factors. These include rates of voting in local elections, contacting local public officials, joining a neighborhood group and discussing politics with friends or family.

Kansas City Star

Earlier this month, racist messages were written on the sidewalks of a college in a small Kansas town, reports The Kansas City Star.

Creative Commons

Exactly how flat is Kansas?

As Atlas Obscura reports, Kansas geographer Jerry Dobson has been dogged his whole career by that very question. Finally, a few years ago, he and fellow Kansas geographer Joshua Campbell undertook to measure the flatness of every state in the union.

Michael Schumacher / Amarillo Globe-News

An Amarillo man who made headlines last month for his creative way of helping others is at it again.

Last month Kit Rudd gained statewide attention for living among the homeless in Amarillo to call attention to their plight. And now Rudd has announced that, later this month, he plans to ride the 300 miles to Dallas on horseback.

RJ Sangosti / The Denver Post

Autumn is just around the corner and the Denver Post has published a list of perfect drives for seeing Colorado’s beautiful fall colors. Rocky Mountain State Park provides an added bonus in addition to its breathtaking leaves. Elk herds can be seen congregating in the meadows during the fall, with bulls emitting their high-pitched bugle call.

Metrocosm / Washington Post

Immigration has been a hot-button issue throughout the 2016 presidential race. But, according to surveys, Americans actually know very little about the issue.

The Washington Post recently noted that it was “remarkable just how much Americans overestimate immigration in their country.” On average, Americans guessed that one-third of people in the U.S. are immigrants. That’s more than double the actual figure.

Center for Rural Affairs

Tyler Vacha grew up on a farm in Nebraska, and he learned a lot of valuable lessons there. In a recent essay for the Center for Rural Affairs, Tyler wondered if the important lessons he picked up would be foreign to children of the twenty-first century.

Tyler wrote that he’s recently become aware that he’d taken his experiences on the farm for granted. How, he wondered, will he teach his kids to be responsible without asking them to feed and water livestock?

Morning Consult

Rural residents still aren’t using the internet as much as their urban counterparts, according to a new study.

Alex Livesey / Getty Images

Texas athletes fared remarkably well during the first week of the Olympics, reports Texas Monthly. During the first seven days in Rio, Texans took home thirteen medals, eight of which were golds. As a matter of fact, a full one third of the United States’ medal count has been won by Texan athletes.

I just received this incredible thank-you card from Sarai, my new buddy at the Canyon Public Library. She came in to drop off her registration for our Chase the Sunset event in the Palo Duro Canyon, and I got her to record a station ID for High Plains Morning. Thank you, Sarai! You'll never understand how VERY happy this makes a morning DJ!

  

The Gazette

Colorado and Kansas are two of the most welcoming states toward refugees, according to a new study.

Researchers from the International Rescue Committee combed through tweets from all 50 states looking for positive and negative language regarding refugees. Colorado ranks eighth for having the most positive tweets regarding newcomers fleeing terror and hardship, reports The Gazette. Kansas performed even better, landing at fourth on the list.

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