license plates

Eric T Gunther / Wikimedia Commons

Last year, Texas rejected almost 2,500 vanity license plates that violated approval guidelines. As The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports, the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles turned down the requests for a variety of reasons, including messages that were too political or too sexy.

Some of the requested messages that ran afoul of political guidelines included plates reading NOTRUMP, NOBAMA, and N2TRUMP.

ok.gov

The start of this new year marked the deadline for all Oklahomans to have new license plates on their vehicles. So that means, if you’re driving around the Oklahoma Panhandle on Jan. 2 with one of the old license plates on your vehicle, you could be breaking the law.

My Plates press release

Seventeen years ago, at the dawn of the new millennium, the State of Texas scrapped its traditional white license plates for a more graphics-heavy design.

The 2000 plate, with its cowboy and space shuttle and oil derricks and moon and stars, gained popularity among some but was lambasted by others who saw the design as an unfortunate departure from the clean design of the past.

If you fall into the first group, then you have cause to rejoice this month as the state has announced that independent contractor My Plates is bringing back the millennial design.

Clover Partners / Nature Conservancy

HPPR reported yesterday on the new license plate design for Oklahoma, which has drawn criticism from some residents. For those Oklahomans who don’t love the new plate, there’s another option. Another new license plate hopes to bring Oklahoma’s state mammal, the American Bison, into the spotlight.

State of Oklahoma

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin unveiled the state’s new license plate this month, and some have been critical of the plate’s design.

As News on 6 reports, the new license plate features a starkly-outlined scissor-tailed flycatcher against a light blue background. The scissortail is the state bird of Oklahoma. Some Oklahomans had trouble identifying the bird on the plate, with one interviewee suggesting it was a dove, and another asking if it was a peacock.