U.S. Supreme Court

Eric Gay / AP photo

This week the Supreme Court struck down a Texas law that had closed over half the state’s abortion clinics.

Now the question becomes, will those clinics re-open? And if so, when?

Brennan Linsley / AP photo

The US Supreme Court has declined to hear a lawsuit challenging Colorado’s marijuana legalization law, reports The New York Times. Two other High Plains states, Nebraska and Oklahoma, had sought to use a rare procedure to attack the Colorado law by going directly to the high court.

Western History Collections / University of Oklahoma

70 years ago Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher was refused admittance to the University of Oklahoma’s law school. The reason? The color of her skin. State law mandated the segregation of public educational institutions. The ensuing legal battle made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court two years later, notes member station KGOU.

Drew Angerer / Getty Images

While the nation’s political realm reels from the sudden death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the demise of the conservative icon could be good news for those concerned about climate change. Slate notes that Scalia’s death came just days after the high court blocked the implementation of the Clean Power Plan. The plan is Obama’s centerpiece climate legislation.

Texas Remains a Burr Under the Supreme Court's Saddle

Dec 30, 2015
AP photo

These days the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing a lot from the Lone Star State. USA TODAY reports that nearly all the court's top cases come from Texas, from abortion and affirmative action to voting rights and immigration.

Supreme Court to Rule onTexas Voting Rights Case

Jun 15, 2015
Todd Wiseman

The US Supreme Court has taken up a Texas voting rights case, known as Evenwel v. Abbott, reports the Texas Tribune. At issue is whether Texas voting districts fairly represent their citizens.

britannica.com

The U. S. Supreme Court recently struck down sections of the Voting Rights Act.  The portions eliminated required some states, including Texas, to obtain preapproval from the federal government before changing election laws. 

KUT reported it is uncertain how the Supreme Court decision will affect two current Texas issues: