wildfires

weather.gov/norman / KGOU

April’s weather was exceptionally aggressive this year in Oklahoma, reports KGOU. Despite early fears of a growing drought, the state saw the seventh-wettest April on record. Statewide, Oklahoma received more than six inches of precipitation during the month.

Building fence facts

Apr 20, 2016
Deb Farris / KAKE

From Kansas Agland:

Last week, livestock markets in Pratt and Reno counties helped raise $120,000 by auctioning off a donated heifer and two steer calves in an effort to raise funds to aid ranchers with wildfire losses in Reno, Harvey, Barber and Comanche counties.

Olivia Morrison / Wichita Eagle

Last month saw the worst wildfire in Kansas history. The fires in Kansas can be partially blamed on a plant that was of little concern a half century ago. Fifty years ago red cedar trees in Kansas were counted in the tens of thousands. Now the number is closer to 100 million, reports Kansas.com. Just in the last ten years the number of cedar trees in the state has jumped by thirty million. The cedars, sometimes called junipers, make ideal kindling for wildfires. And when you toss in recent high winds and drought conditions, you’ve got a deadly combination.

Manda Bricker / Kansas Agland

 From Kansas Agland:

The lone heifer was the star of Pratt Livestock's Thursday sale, raising more than $90,000 in funds for the Gyp Hills wildfires.

"People have been very generous," said Jake Lewis, the auction market's general manager.

Producer Dave Clawson, of Plains, donated the heifer for the noon bidding.

Candace Krebs / Ag Journal Online

The mild winter on the High Plains has changed to a dry and windy spring of unusual warmth. And the weather is wreaking havoc in various ways. For example, reports Ag Journal, a huge wildfire flared up across portions of northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas last week. And wheat stripe rust was discovered in eastern Colorado, much earlier than expected. Stripe rust is a disease that can threaten wheat yields.

OK's Sea of Juniper May Require Fire

Nov 23, 2015
inverse.com

Oklahoma rangeland specialists are warning of a slow-motion ecological disaster, reports inverse.com. Juniper trees are gradually stripping Oklahoma of its grasslands. They’re everywhere, eating up the plains. These trees destroy historical ecosystems and fill in otherwise productive rangeland. Two different species of juniper are causing problems: Ashe juniper and eastern redcedar.

oklahomafarmreport.com

The U.S. Department of Defense and the Environmental Protection Agency will no longer provide no-cost surplus military vehicles and equipment to fire departments across the country reported StateImpact Oklahoma.

colostate.edu

The fire outlook for Colorado was recently released by the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention & Control.  The document shows the areas with the greatest potential wildfire danger are the plains of Eastern Colorado reported Laura Palmisano for KVNF

Smoky Skies Affect the Region, Study Says

Oct 29, 2013
NASA Earth Observatory

The destruction caused by wildfires may be obvious to the observer, but one new piece of research brings attention to the potential effects of smoke from those wildfires.

The majority of the High Plains region falls under an area of the nation most affected by plumes of smoke from wildfires and other causes, according to research by environmental group Natural Resources Defense Council.

It Could be a Long Fire Season in Texas

Jun 7, 2013

In the past few months, red flag warnings for areas of the high plains seem to be in effect more often than not. This summer could hold more of the same.